- made the disadvantage (not interactive) an advantage (multiple interfaces).
authorRichard Kreckel <Richard.Kreckel@uni-mainz.de>
Mon, 7 Feb 2000 19:22:30 +0000 (19:22 +0000)
committerRichard Kreckel <Richard.Kreckel@uni-mainz.de>
Mon, 7 Feb 2000 19:22:30 +0000 (19:22 +0000)
doc/tutorial/ginac.texi

index 7e3b98a35f6eb67ce6064e23acd8e6a0461dc68c..73e1547bc975980a33bb7692cc647826f1fe86c6 100644 (file)
@@ -1866,6 +1866,18 @@ usually only extend on a high level by writing in the language defined
 by the parser.  In particular, it turns out to be almost impossible to
 fix bugs in a traditional system.
 
+@item
+multiple interfaces: Though real GiNaC programs have to be written in
+some editor, then be compiled, linked and executed, there are more ways
+to work with the GiNaC engine.  Many people want to play with
+expressions interactively, as in traditional CASs.  Currently, two such
+windows into GiNaC have been implemented and many more are possible: the
+tiny @command{ginsh} that is part of the distribution exposes GiNaC's
+types to a command line and second, as a more consistent approach, an
+interactive interface to the @acronym{Cint} C++ interpreter has been put
+together (called @acronym{GiNaC-cint}) that allows an interactive
+scripting interface consistent with the C++ language.
+
 @item
 seemless integration: it is somewhere between difficult and impossible
 to call CAS functions from within a program written in C++ or any other
@@ -1894,18 +1906,6 @@ Of course it also has some disadvantages:
 
 @itemize @bullet
 
-@item
-not interactive: GiNaC programs have to be written in an editor,
-compiled and executed.  You cannot play with expressions interactively.
-However, such an extension is not inherently forbidden by design.  In
-fact, two interactive interfaces are possible: First, a shell that
-exposes GiNaC's types to a command line can readily be written (the tiny
-@command{ginsh} that is part of the distribution being an example).
-Second, as a more consistent approach, an interactive interface to the
-@acronym{CINT} C++ interpreter is under development (called
-@acronym{GiNaC-cint}) that will allow an interactive interface
-consistent with the C++ language.
-
 @item
 advanced features: GiNaC cannot compete with a program like
 @emph{Reduce} which exists for more than 30 years now or @emph{Maple}