]> www.ginac.de Git - ginac.git/blob - doc/tutorial/ginac.texi
Introducing method symbol::get_TeX_name() to match existing symbol::get_name().
[ginac.git] / doc / tutorial / ginac.texi
1 \input texinfo  @c -*-texinfo-*-
2 @c %**start of header
3 @setfilename ginac.info
4 @settitle GiNaC, an open framework for symbolic computation within the C++ programming language
5 @setchapternewpage on
6 @afourpaper
7 @c For `info' only.
8 @paragraphindent 0
9 @c For TeX only.
10 @iftex
11 @c I hate putting "@noindent" in front of every paragraph.
12 @parindent=0pt
13 @end iftex
14 @c %**end of header
15
16 @include version.texi
17
18 @dircategory Mathematics
19 @direntry
20 * ginac: (ginac).                   C++ library for symbolic computation.
21 @end direntry
22
23 @ifinfo
24 This is a tutorial that documents GiNaC @value{VERSION}, an open
25 framework for symbolic computation within the C++ programming language.
26
27 Copyright (C) 1999-2017 Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany
28
29 Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
30 this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
31 are preserved on all copies.
32
33 @ignore
34 Permission is granted to process this file through TeX and print the
35 results, provided the printed document carries copying permission
36 notice identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph
37
38 @end ignore
39 Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
40 manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
41 resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
42 notice identical to this one.
43 @end ifinfo
44
45 @finalout
46 @c finalout prevents ugly black rectangles on overfull hbox lines
47 @titlepage
48 @title GiNaC @value{VERSION}
49 @subtitle An open framework for symbolic computation within the C++ programming language
50 @subtitle @value{UPDATED}
51 @author @uref{http://www.ginac.de}
52
53 @page
54 @vskip 0pt plus 1filll
55 Copyright @copyright{} 1999-2017 Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany
56 @sp 2
57 Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
58 this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
59 are preserved on all copies.
60
61 Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
62 manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the entire
63 resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission
64 notice identical to this one.
65 @end titlepage
66
67 @page
68 @contents
69
70 @page
71
72
73 @node Top, Introduction, (dir), (dir)
74 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
75 @top GiNaC
76
77 This is a tutorial that documents GiNaC @value{VERSION}, an open
78 framework for symbolic computation within the C++ programming language.
79
80 @menu
81 * Introduction::                 GiNaC's purpose.
82 * A tour of GiNaC::              A quick tour of the library.
83 * Installation::                 How to install the package.
84 * Basic concepts::               Description of fundamental classes.
85 * Methods and functions::        Algorithms for symbolic manipulations.
86 * Extending GiNaC::              How to extend the library.
87 * A comparison with other CAS::  Compares GiNaC to traditional CAS.
88 * Internal structures::          Description of some internal structures.
89 * Package tools::                Configuring packages to work with GiNaC.
90 * Bibliography::
91 * Concept index::
92 @end menu
93
94
95 @node Introduction, A tour of GiNaC, Top, Top
96 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
97 @chapter Introduction
98 @cindex history of GiNaC
99
100 The motivation behind GiNaC derives from the observation that most
101 present day computer algebra systems (CAS) are linguistically and
102 semantically impoverished.  Although they are quite powerful tools for
103 learning math and solving particular problems they lack modern
104 linguistic structures that allow for the creation of large-scale
105 projects.  GiNaC is an attempt to overcome this situation by extending a
106 well established and standardized computer language (C++) by some
107 fundamental symbolic capabilities, thus allowing for integrated systems
108 that embed symbolic manipulations together with more established areas
109 of computer science (like computation-intense numeric applications,
110 graphical interfaces, etc.) under one roof.
111
112 The particular problem that led to the writing of the GiNaC framework is
113 still a very active field of research, namely the calculation of higher
114 order corrections to elementary particle interactions.  There,
115 theoretical physicists are interested in matching present day theories
116 against experiments taking place at particle accelerators.  The
117 computations involved are so complex they call for a combined symbolical
118 and numerical approach.  This turned out to be quite difficult to
119 accomplish with the present day CAS we have worked with so far and so we
120 tried to fill the gap by writing GiNaC.  But of course its applications
121 are in no way restricted to theoretical physics.
122
123 This tutorial is intended for the novice user who is new to GiNaC but
124 already has some background in C++ programming.  However, since a
125 hand-made documentation like this one is difficult to keep in sync with
126 the development, the actual documentation is inside the sources in the
127 form of comments.  That documentation may be parsed by one of the many
128 Javadoc-like documentation systems.  If you fail at generating it you
129 may access it from @uref{http://www.ginac.de/reference/, the GiNaC home
130 page}.  It is an invaluable resource not only for the advanced user who
131 wishes to extend the system (or chase bugs) but for everybody who wants
132 to comprehend the inner workings of GiNaC.  This little tutorial on the
133 other hand only covers the basic things that are unlikely to change in
134 the near future.
135
136 @section License
137 The GiNaC framework for symbolic computation within the C++ programming
138 language is Copyright @copyright{} 1999-2017 Johannes Gutenberg
139 University Mainz, Germany.
140
141 This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
142 modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
143 published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
144 License, or (at your option) any later version.
145
146 This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
147 WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
148 MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
149 General Public License for more details.
150
151 You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
152 along with this program; see the file COPYING.  If not, write to the
153 Free Software Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston,
154 MA 02110-1301, USA.
155
156
157 @node A tour of GiNaC, How to use it from within C++, Introduction, Top
158 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
159 @chapter A Tour of GiNaC
160
161 This quick tour of GiNaC wants to arise your interest in the
162 subsequent chapters by showing off a bit.  Please excuse us if it
163 leaves many open questions.
164
165 @menu
166 * How to use it from within C++::  Two simple examples.
167 * What it can do for you::         A Tour of GiNaC's features.
168 @end menu
169
170
171 @node How to use it from within C++, What it can do for you, A tour of GiNaC, A tour of GiNaC
172 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
173 @section How to use it from within C++
174
175 The GiNaC open framework for symbolic computation within the C++ programming
176 language does not try to define a language of its own as conventional
177 CAS do.  Instead, it extends the capabilities of C++ by symbolic
178 manipulations.  Here is how to generate and print a simple (and rather
179 pointless) bivariate polynomial with some large coefficients:
180
181 @example
182 #include <iostream>
183 #include <ginac/ginac.h>
184 using namespace std;
185 using namespace GiNaC;
186
187 int main()
188 @{
189     symbol x("x"), y("y");
190     ex poly;
191
192     for (int i=0; i<3; ++i)
193         poly += factorial(i+16)*pow(x,i)*pow(y,2-i);
194
195     cout << poly << endl;
196     return 0;
197 @}
198 @end example
199
200 Assuming the file is called @file{hello.cc}, on our system we can compile
201 and run it like this:
202
203 @example
204 $ c++ hello.cc -o hello -lcln -lginac
205 $ ./hello
206 355687428096000*x*y+20922789888000*y^2+6402373705728000*x^2
207 @end example
208
209 (@xref{Package tools}, for tools that help you when creating a software
210 package that uses GiNaC.)
211
212 @cindex Hermite polynomial
213 Next, there is a more meaningful C++ program that calls a function which
214 generates Hermite polynomials in a specified free variable.
215
216 @example
217 #include <iostream>
218 #include <ginac/ginac.h>
219 using namespace std;
220 using namespace GiNaC;
221
222 ex HermitePoly(const symbol & x, int n)
223 @{
224     ex HKer=exp(-pow(x, 2));
225     // uses the identity H_n(x) == (-1)^n exp(x^2) (d/dx)^n exp(-x^2)
226     return normal(pow(-1, n) * diff(HKer, x, n) / HKer);
227 @}
228
229 int main()
230 @{
231     symbol z("z");
232
233     for (int i=0; i<6; ++i)
234         cout << "H_" << i << "(z) == " << HermitePoly(z,i) << endl;
235
236     return 0;
237 @}
238 @end example
239
240 When run, this will type out
241
242 @example
243 H_0(z) == 1
244 H_1(z) == 2*z
245 H_2(z) == 4*z^2-2
246 H_3(z) == -12*z+8*z^3
247 H_4(z) == -48*z^2+16*z^4+12
248 H_5(z) == 120*z-160*z^3+32*z^5
249 @end example
250
251 This method of generating the coefficients is of course far from optimal
252 for production purposes.
253
254 In order to show some more examples of what GiNaC can do we will now use
255 the @command{ginsh}, a simple GiNaC interactive shell that provides a
256 convenient window into GiNaC's capabilities.
257
258
259 @node What it can do for you, Installation, How to use it from within C++, A tour of GiNaC
260 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
261 @section What it can do for you
262
263 @cindex @command{ginsh}
264 After invoking @command{ginsh} one can test and experiment with GiNaC's
265 features much like in other Computer Algebra Systems except that it does
266 not provide programming constructs like loops or conditionals.  For a
267 concise description of the @command{ginsh} syntax we refer to its
268 accompanied man page. Suffice to say that assignments and comparisons in
269 @command{ginsh} are written as they are in C, i.e. @code{=} assigns and
270 @code{==} compares.
271
272 It can manipulate arbitrary precision integers in a very fast way.
273 Rational numbers are automatically converted to fractions of coprime
274 integers:
275
276 @example
277 > x=3^150;
278 369988485035126972924700782451696644186473100389722973815184405301748249
279 > y=3^149;
280 123329495011708990974900260817232214728824366796574324605061468433916083
281 > x/y;
282 3
283 > y/x;
284 1/3
285 @end example
286
287 Exact numbers are always retained as exact numbers and only evaluated as
288 floating point numbers if requested.  For instance, with numeric
289 radicals is dealt pretty much as with symbols.  Products of sums of them
290 can be expanded:
291
292 @example
293 > expand((1+a^(1/5)-a^(2/5))^3);
294 1+3*a+3*a^(1/5)-5*a^(3/5)-a^(6/5)
295 > expand((1+3^(1/5)-3^(2/5))^3);
296 10-5*3^(3/5)
297 > evalf((1+3^(1/5)-3^(2/5))^3);
298 0.33408977534118624228
299 @end example
300
301 The function @code{evalf} that was used above converts any number in
302 GiNaC's expressions into floating point numbers.  This can be done to
303 arbitrary predefined accuracy:
304
305 @example
306 > evalf(1/7);
307 0.14285714285714285714
308 > Digits=150;
309 150
310 > evalf(1/7);
311 0.1428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428
312 5714285714285714285714285714285714285
313 @end example
314
315 Exact numbers other than rationals that can be manipulated in GiNaC
316 include predefined constants like Archimedes' @code{Pi}.  They can both
317 be used in symbolic manipulations (as an exact number) as well as in
318 numeric expressions (as an inexact number):
319
320 @example
321 > a=Pi^2+x;
322 x+Pi^2
323 > evalf(a);
324 9.869604401089358619+x
325 > x=2;
326 2
327 > evalf(a);
328 11.869604401089358619
329 @end example
330
331 Built-in functions evaluate immediately to exact numbers if
332 this is possible.  Conversions that can be safely performed are done
333 immediately; conversions that are not generally valid are not done:
334
335 @example
336 > cos(42*Pi);
337 1
338 > cos(acos(x));
339 x
340 > acos(cos(x));
341 acos(cos(x))
342 @end example
343
344 (Note that converting the last input to @code{x} would allow one to
345 conclude that @code{42*Pi} is equal to @code{0}.)
346
347 Linear equation systems can be solved along with basic linear
348 algebra manipulations over symbolic expressions.  In C++ GiNaC offers
349 a matrix class for this purpose but we can see what it can do using
350 @command{ginsh}'s bracket notation to type them in:
351
352 @example
353 > lsolve(a+x*y==z,x);
354 y^(-1)*(z-a);
355 > lsolve(@{3*x+5*y == 7, -2*x+10*y == -5@}, @{x, y@});
356 @{x==19/8,y==-1/40@}
357 > M = [ [1, 3], [-3, 2] ];
358 [[1,3],[-3,2]]
359 > determinant(M);
360 11
361 > charpoly(M,lambda);
362 lambda^2-3*lambda+11
363 > A = [ [1, 1], [2, -1] ];
364 [[1,1],[2,-1]]
365 > A+2*M;
366 [[1,1],[2,-1]]+2*[[1,3],[-3,2]]
367 > evalm(%);
368 [[3,7],[-4,3]]
369 > B = [ [0, 0, a], [b, 1, -b], [-1/a, 0, 0] ];
370 > evalm(B^(2^12345));
371 [[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]]
372 @end example
373
374 Multivariate polynomials and rational functions may be expanded,
375 collected and normalized (i.e. converted to a ratio of two coprime 
376 polynomials):
377
378 @example
379 > a = x^4 + 2*x^2*y^2 + 4*x^3*y + 12*x*y^3 - 3*y^4;
380 12*x*y^3+2*x^2*y^2+4*x^3*y-3*y^4+x^4
381 > b = x^2 + 4*x*y - y^2;
382 4*x*y-y^2+x^2
383 > expand(a*b);
384 8*x^5*y+17*x^4*y^2+43*x^2*y^4-24*x*y^5+16*x^3*y^3+3*y^6+x^6
385 > collect(a+b,x);
386 4*x^3*y-y^2-3*y^4+(12*y^3+4*y)*x+x^4+x^2*(1+2*y^2)
387 > collect(a+b,y);
388 12*x*y^3-3*y^4+(-1+2*x^2)*y^2+(4*x+4*x^3)*y+x^2+x^4
389 > normal(a/b);
390 3*y^2+x^2
391 @end example
392
393 You can differentiate functions and expand them as Taylor or Laurent
394 series in a very natural syntax (the second argument of @code{series} is
395 a relation defining the evaluation point, the third specifies the
396 order):
397
398 @cindex Zeta function
399 @example
400 > diff(tan(x),x);
401 tan(x)^2+1
402 > series(sin(x),x==0,4);
403 x-1/6*x^3+Order(x^4)
404 > series(1/tan(x),x==0,4);
405 x^(-1)-1/3*x+Order(x^2)
406 > series(tgamma(x),x==0,3);
407 x^(-1)-Euler+(1/12*Pi^2+1/2*Euler^2)*x+
408 (-1/3*zeta(3)-1/12*Pi^2*Euler-1/6*Euler^3)*x^2+Order(x^3)
409 > evalf(%);
410 x^(-1)-0.5772156649015328606+(0.9890559953279725555)*x
411 -(0.90747907608088628905)*x^2+Order(x^3)
412 > series(tgamma(2*sin(x)-2),x==Pi/2,6);
413 -(x-1/2*Pi)^(-2)+(-1/12*Pi^2-1/2*Euler^2-1/240)*(x-1/2*Pi)^2
414 -Euler-1/12+Order((x-1/2*Pi)^3)
415 @end example
416
417 Here we have made use of the @command{ginsh}-command @code{%} to pop the
418 previously evaluated element from @command{ginsh}'s internal stack.
419
420 Often, functions don't have roots in closed form.  Nevertheless, it's
421 quite easy to compute a solution numerically, to arbitrary precision:
422
423 @cindex fsolve
424 @example
425 > Digits=50:
426 > fsolve(cos(x)==x,x,0,2);
427 0.7390851332151606416553120876738734040134117589007574649658
428 > f=exp(sin(x))-x:
429 > X=fsolve(f,x,-10,10);
430 2.2191071489137460325957851882042901681753665565320678854155
431 > subs(f,x==X);
432 -6.372367644529809108115521591070847222364418220770475144296E-58
433 @end example
434
435 Notice how the final result above differs slightly from zero by about
436 @math{6*10^(-58)}.  This is because with 50 decimal digits precision the
437 root cannot be represented more accurately than @code{X}.  Such
438 inaccuracies are to be expected when computing with finite floating
439 point values.
440
441 If you ever wanted to convert units in C or C++ and found this is
442 cumbersome, here is the solution.  Symbolic types can always be used as
443 tags for different types of objects.  Converting from wrong units to the
444 metric system is now easy:
445
446 @example
447 > in=.0254*m;
448 0.0254*m
449 > lb=.45359237*kg;
450 0.45359237*kg
451 > 200*lb/in^2;
452 140613.91592783185568*kg*m^(-2)
453 @end example
454
455
456 @node Installation, Prerequisites, What it can do for you, Top
457 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
458 @chapter Installation
459
460 @cindex CLN
461 GiNaC's installation follows the spirit of most GNU software. It is
462 easily installed on your system by three steps: configuration, build,
463 installation.
464
465 @menu
466 * Prerequisites::                Packages upon which GiNaC depends.
467 * Configuration::                How to configure GiNaC.
468 * Building GiNaC::               How to compile GiNaC.
469 * Installing GiNaC::             How to install GiNaC on your system.
470 @end menu
471
472
473 @node Prerequisites, Configuration, Installation, Installation
474 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
475 @section Prerequisites
476
477 In order to install GiNaC on your system, some prerequisites need to be
478 met.  First of all, you need to have a C++-compiler adhering to the
479 ISO standard @cite{ISO/IEC 14882:2011(E)}.  We used GCC for development
480 so if you have a different compiler you are on your own.  For the
481 configuration to succeed you need a Posix compliant shell installed in
482 @file{/bin/sh}, GNU @command{bash} is fine. The pkg-config utility is
483 required for the configuration, it can be downloaded from
484 @uref{http://pkg-config.freedesktop.org}.
485 Last but not least, the CLN library
486 is used extensively and needs to be installed on your system.
487 Please get it from @uref{http://www.ginac.de/CLN/} (it is licensed under
488 the GPL) and install it prior to trying to install GiNaC.  The configure
489 script checks if it can find it and if it cannot, it will refuse to
490 continue.
491
492
493 @node Configuration, Building GiNaC, Prerequisites, Installation
494 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
495 @section Configuration
496 @cindex configuration
497 @cindex Autoconf
498
499 To configure GiNaC means to prepare the source distribution for
500 building.  It is done via a shell script called @command{configure} that
501 is shipped with the sources and was originally generated by GNU
502 Autoconf.  Since a configure script generated by GNU Autoconf never
503 prompts, all customization must be done either via command line
504 parameters or environment variables.  It accepts a list of parameters,
505 the complete set of which can be listed by calling it with the
506 @option{--help} option.  The most important ones will be shortly
507 described in what follows:
508
509 @itemize @bullet
510
511 @item
512 @option{--disable-shared}: When given, this option switches off the
513 build of a shared library, i.e. a @file{.so} file.  This may be convenient
514 when developing because it considerably speeds up compilation.
515
516 @item
517 @option{--prefix=@var{PREFIX}}: The directory where the compiled library
518 and headers are installed. It defaults to @file{/usr/local} which means
519 that the library is installed in the directory @file{/usr/local/lib},
520 the header files in @file{/usr/local/include/ginac} and the documentation
521 (like this one) into @file{/usr/local/share/doc/GiNaC}.
522
523 @item
524 @option{--libdir=@var{LIBDIR}}: Use this option in case you want to have
525 the library installed in some other directory than
526 @file{@var{PREFIX}/lib/}.
527
528 @item
529 @option{--includedir=@var{INCLUDEDIR}}: Use this option in case you want
530 to have the header files installed in some other directory than
531 @file{@var{PREFIX}/include/ginac/}. For instance, if you specify
532 @option{--includedir=/usr/include} you will end up with the header files
533 sitting in the directory @file{/usr/include/ginac/}. Note that the
534 subdirectory @file{ginac} is enforced by this process in order to
535 keep the header files separated from others.  This avoids some
536 clashes and allows for an easier deinstallation of GiNaC. This ought
537 to be considered A Good Thing (tm).
538
539 @item
540 @option{--datadir=@var{DATADIR}}: This option may be given in case you
541 want to have the documentation installed in some other directory than
542 @file{@var{PREFIX}/share/doc/GiNaC/}.
543
544 @end itemize
545
546 In addition, you may specify some environment variables.  @env{CXX}
547 holds the path and the name of the C++ compiler in case you want to
548 override the default in your path.  (The @command{configure} script
549 searches your path for @command{c++}, @command{g++}, @command{gcc},
550 @command{CC}, @command{cxx} and @command{cc++} in that order.)  It may
551 be very useful to define some compiler flags with the @env{CXXFLAGS}
552 environment variable, like optimization, debugging information and
553 warning levels.  If omitted, it defaults to @option{-g
554 -O2}.@footnote{The @command{configure} script is itself generated from
555 the file @file{configure.ac}.  It is only distributed in packaged
556 releases of GiNaC.  If you got the naked sources, e.g. from git, you
557 must generate @command{configure} along with the various
558 @file{Makefile.in} by using the @command{autoreconf} utility.  This will
559 require a fair amount of support from your local toolchain, though.}
560
561 The whole process is illustrated in the following two
562 examples. (Substitute @command{setenv @var{VARIABLE} @var{value}} for
563 @command{export @var{VARIABLE}=@var{value}} if the Berkeley C shell is
564 your login shell.)
565
566 Here is a simple configuration for a site-wide GiNaC library assuming
567 everything is in default paths:
568
569 @example
570 $ export CXXFLAGS="-Wall -O2"
571 $ ./configure
572 @end example
573
574 And here is a configuration for a private static GiNaC library with
575 several components sitting in custom places (site-wide GCC and private
576 CLN).  The compiler is persuaded to be picky and full assertions and
577 debugging information are switched on:
578
579 @example
580 $ export CXX=/usr/local/gnu/bin/c++
581 $ export CPPFLAGS="$(CPPFLAGS) -I$(HOME)/include"
582 $ export CXXFLAGS="$(CXXFLAGS) -DDO_GINAC_ASSERT -ggdb -Wall -pedantic"
583 $ export LDFLAGS="$(LDFLAGS) -L$(HOME)/lib"
584 $ ./configure --disable-shared --prefix=$(HOME)
585 @end example
586
587
588 @node Building GiNaC, Installing GiNaC, Configuration, Installation
589 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
590 @section Building GiNaC
591 @cindex building GiNaC
592
593 After proper configuration you should just build the whole
594 library by typing
595 @example
596 $ make
597 @end example
598 at the command prompt and go for a cup of coffee.  The exact time it
599 takes to compile GiNaC depends not only on the speed of your machines
600 but also on other parameters, for instance what value for @env{CXXFLAGS}
601 you entered.  Optimization may be very time-consuming.
602
603 Just to make sure GiNaC works properly you may run a collection of
604 regression tests by typing
605
606 @example
607 $ make check
608 @end example
609
610 This will compile some sample programs, run them and check the output
611 for correctness.  The regression tests fall in three categories.  First,
612 the so called @emph{exams} are performed, simple tests where some
613 predefined input is evaluated (like a pupils' exam).  Second, the
614 @emph{checks} test the coherence of results among each other with
615 possible random input.  Third, some @emph{timings} are performed, which
616 benchmark some predefined problems with different sizes and display the
617 CPU time used in seconds.  Each individual test should return a message
618 @samp{passed}.  This is mostly intended to be a QA-check if something
619 was broken during development, not a sanity check of your system.  Some
620 of the tests in sections @emph{checks} and @emph{timings} may require
621 insane amounts of memory and CPU time.  Feel free to kill them if your
622 machine catches fire.  Another quite important intent is to allow people
623 to fiddle around with optimization.
624
625 By default, the only documentation that will be built is this tutorial
626 in @file{.info} format. To build the GiNaC tutorial and reference manual
627 in HTML, DVI, PostScript, or PDF formats, use one of
628
629 @example
630 $ make html
631 $ make dvi
632 $ make ps
633 $ make pdf
634 @end example
635
636 Generally, the top-level Makefile runs recursively to the
637 subdirectories.  It is therefore safe to go into any subdirectory
638 (@code{doc/}, @code{ginsh/}, @dots{}) and simply type @code{make}
639 @var{target} there in case something went wrong.
640
641
642 @node Installing GiNaC, Basic concepts, Building GiNaC, Installation
643 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
644 @section Installing GiNaC
645 @cindex installation
646
647 To install GiNaC on your system, simply type
648
649 @example
650 $ make install
651 @end example
652
653 As described in the section about configuration the files will be
654 installed in the following directories (the directories will be created
655 if they don't already exist):
656
657 @itemize @bullet
658
659 @item
660 @file{libginac.a} will go into @file{@var{PREFIX}/lib/} (or
661 @file{@var{LIBDIR}}) which defaults to @file{/usr/local/lib/}.
662 So will @file{libginac.so} unless the configure script was
663 given the option @option{--disable-shared}.  The proper symlinks
664 will be established as well.
665
666 @item
667 All the header files will be installed into @file{@var{PREFIX}/include/ginac/}
668 (or @file{@var{INCLUDEDIR}/ginac/}, if specified).
669
670 @item
671 All documentation (info) will be stuffed into
672 @file{@var{PREFIX}/share/doc/GiNaC/} (or
673 @file{@var{DATADIR}/doc/GiNaC/}, if @var{DATADIR} was specified).
674
675 @end itemize
676
677 For the sake of completeness we will list some other useful make
678 targets: @command{make clean} deletes all files generated by
679 @command{make}, i.e. all the object files.  In addition @command{make
680 distclean} removes all files generated by the configuration and
681 @command{make maintainer-clean} goes one step further and deletes files
682 that may require special tools to rebuild (like the @command{libtool}
683 for instance).  Finally @command{make uninstall} removes the installed
684 library, header files and documentation@footnote{Uninstallation does not
685 work after you have called @command{make distclean} since the
686 @file{Makefile} is itself generated by the configuration from
687 @file{Makefile.in} and hence deleted by @command{make distclean}.  There
688 are two obvious ways out of this dilemma.  First, you can run the
689 configuration again with the same @var{PREFIX} thus creating a
690 @file{Makefile} with a working @samp{uninstall} target.  Second, you can
691 do it by hand since you now know where all the files went during
692 installation.}.
693
694
695 @node Basic concepts, Expressions, Installing GiNaC, Top
696 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
697 @chapter Basic concepts
698
699 This chapter will describe the different fundamental objects that can be
700 handled by GiNaC.  But before doing so, it is worthwhile introducing you
701 to the more commonly used class of expressions, representing a flexible
702 meta-class for storing all mathematical objects.
703
704 @menu
705 * Expressions::                  The fundamental GiNaC class.
706 * Automatic evaluation::         Evaluation and canonicalization.
707 * Error handling::               How the library reports errors.
708 * The class hierarchy::          Overview of GiNaC's classes.
709 * Symbols::                      Symbolic objects.
710 * Numbers::                      Numerical objects.
711 * Constants::                    Pre-defined constants.
712 * Fundamental containers::       Sums, products and powers.
713 * Lists::                        Lists of expressions.
714 * Mathematical functions::       Mathematical functions.
715 * Relations::                    Equality, Inequality and all that.
716 * Integrals::                    Symbolic integrals.
717 * Matrices::                     Matrices.
718 * Indexed objects::              Handling indexed quantities.
719 * Non-commutative objects::      Algebras with non-commutative products.
720 * Hash maps::                    A faster alternative to std::map<>.
721 @end menu
722
723
724 @node Expressions, Automatic evaluation, Basic concepts, Basic concepts
725 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
726 @section Expressions
727 @cindex expression (class @code{ex})
728 @cindex @code{has()}
729
730 The most common class of objects a user deals with is the expression
731 @code{ex}, representing a mathematical object like a variable, number,
732 function, sum, product, etc@dots{}  Expressions may be put together to form
733 new expressions, passed as arguments to functions, and so on.  Here is a
734 little collection of valid expressions:
735
736 @example
737 ex MyEx1 = 5;                       // simple number
738 ex MyEx2 = x + 2*y;                 // polynomial in x and y
739 ex MyEx3 = (x + 1)/(x - 1);         // rational expression
740 ex MyEx4 = sin(x + 2*y) + 3*z + 41; // containing a function
741 ex MyEx5 = MyEx4 + 1;               // similar to above
742 @end example
743
744 Expressions are handles to other more fundamental objects, that often
745 contain other expressions thus creating a tree of expressions
746 (@xref{Internal structures}, for particular examples).  Most methods on
747 @code{ex} therefore run top-down through such an expression tree.  For
748 example, the method @code{has()} scans recursively for occurrences of
749 something inside an expression.  Thus, if you have declared @code{MyEx4}
750 as in the example above @code{MyEx4.has(y)} will find @code{y} inside
751 the argument of @code{sin} and hence return @code{true}.
752
753 The next sections will outline the general picture of GiNaC's class
754 hierarchy and describe the classes of objects that are handled by
755 @code{ex}.
756
757 @subsection Note: Expressions and STL containers
758
759 GiNaC expressions (@code{ex} objects) have value semantics (they can be
760 assigned, reassigned and copied like integral types) but the operator
761 @code{<} doesn't provide a well-defined ordering on them. In STL-speak,
762 expressions are @samp{Assignable} but not @samp{LessThanComparable}.
763
764 This implies that in order to use expressions in sorted containers such as
765 @code{std::map<>} and @code{std::set<>} you have to supply a suitable
766 comparison predicate. GiNaC provides such a predicate, called
767 @code{ex_is_less}. For example, a set of expressions should be defined
768 as @code{std::set<ex, ex_is_less>}.
769
770 Unsorted containers such as @code{std::vector<>} and @code{std::list<>}
771 don't pose a problem. A @code{std::vector<ex>} works as expected.
772
773 @xref{Information about expressions}, for more about comparing and ordering
774 expressions.
775
776
777 @node Automatic evaluation, Error handling, Expressions, Basic concepts
778 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
779 @section Automatic evaluation and canonicalization of expressions
780 @cindex evaluation
781
782 GiNaC performs some automatic transformations on expressions, to simplify
783 them and put them into a canonical form. Some examples:
784
785 @example
786 ex MyEx1 = 2*x - 1 + x;  // 3*x-1
787 ex MyEx2 = x - x;        // 0
788 ex MyEx3 = cos(2*Pi);    // 1
789 ex MyEx4 = x*y/x;        // y
790 @end example
791
792 This behavior is usually referred to as @dfn{automatic} or @dfn{anonymous
793 evaluation}. GiNaC only performs transformations that are
794
795 @itemize @bullet
796 @item
797 at most of complexity
798 @tex
799 $O(n\log n)$
800 @end tex
801 @ifnottex
802 @math{O(n log n)}
803 @end ifnottex
804 @item
805 algebraically correct, possibly except for a set of measure zero (e.g.
806 @math{x/x} is transformed to @math{1} although this is incorrect for @math{x=0})
807 @end itemize
808
809 There are two types of automatic transformations in GiNaC that may not
810 behave in an entirely obvious way at first glance:
811
812 @itemize
813 @item
814 The terms of sums and products (and some other things like the arguments of
815 symmetric functions, the indices of symmetric tensors etc.) are re-ordered
816 into a canonical form that is deterministic, but not lexicographical or in
817 any other way easy to guess (it almost always depends on the number and
818 order of the symbols you define). However, constructing the same expression
819 twice, either implicitly or explicitly, will always result in the same
820 canonical form.
821 @item
822 Expressions of the form 'number times sum' are automatically expanded (this
823 has to do with GiNaC's internal representation of sums and products). For
824 example
825 @example
826 ex MyEx5 = 2*(x + y);   // 2*x+2*y
827 ex MyEx6 = z*(x + y);   // z*(x+y)
828 @end example
829 @end itemize
830
831 The general rule is that when you construct expressions, GiNaC automatically
832 creates them in canonical form, which might differ from the form you typed in
833 your program. This may create some awkward looking output (@samp{-y+x} instead
834 of @samp{x-y}) but allows for more efficient operation and usually yields
835 some immediate simplifications.
836
837 @cindex @code{eval()}
838 Internally, the anonymous evaluator in GiNaC is implemented by the methods
839
840 @example
841 ex ex::eval() const;
842 ex basic::eval() const;
843 @end example
844
845 but unless you are extending GiNaC with your own classes or functions, there
846 should never be any reason to call them explicitly. All GiNaC methods that
847 transform expressions, like @code{subs()} or @code{normal()}, automatically
848 re-evaluate their results.
849
850
851 @node Error handling, The class hierarchy, Automatic evaluation, Basic concepts
852 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
853 @section Error handling
854 @cindex exceptions
855 @cindex @code{pole_error} (class)
856
857 GiNaC reports run-time errors by throwing C++ exceptions. All exceptions
858 generated by GiNaC are subclassed from the standard @code{exception} class
859 defined in the @file{<stdexcept>} header. In addition to the predefined
860 @code{logic_error}, @code{domain_error}, @code{out_of_range},
861 @code{invalid_argument}, @code{runtime_error}, @code{range_error} and
862 @code{overflow_error} types, GiNaC also defines a @code{pole_error}
863 exception that gets thrown when trying to evaluate a mathematical function
864 at a singularity.
865
866 The @code{pole_error} class has a member function
867
868 @example
869 int pole_error::degree() const;
870 @end example
871
872 that returns the order of the singularity (or 0 when the pole is
873 logarithmic or the order is undefined).
874
875 When using GiNaC it is useful to arrange for exceptions to be caught in
876 the main program even if you don't want to do any special error handling.
877 Otherwise whenever an error occurs in GiNaC, it will be delegated to the
878 default exception handler of your C++ compiler's run-time system which
879 usually only aborts the program without giving any information what went
880 wrong.
881
882 Here is an example for a @code{main()} function that catches and prints
883 exceptions generated by GiNaC:
884
885 @example
886 #include <iostream>
887 #include <stdexcept>
888 #include <ginac/ginac.h>
889 using namespace std;
890 using namespace GiNaC;
891
892 int main()
893 @{
894     try @{
895         ...
896         // code using GiNaC
897         ...
898     @} catch (exception &p) @{
899         cerr << p.what() << endl;
900         return 1;
901     @}
902     return 0;
903 @}
904 @end example
905
906
907 @node The class hierarchy, Symbols, Error handling, Basic concepts
908 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
909 @section The class hierarchy
910
911 GiNaC's class hierarchy consists of several classes representing
912 mathematical objects, all of which (except for @code{ex} and some
913 helpers) are internally derived from one abstract base class called
914 @code{basic}.  You do not have to deal with objects of class
915 @code{basic}, instead you'll be dealing with symbols, numbers,
916 containers of expressions and so on.
917
918 @cindex container
919 @cindex atom
920 To get an idea about what kinds of symbolic composites may be built we
921 have a look at the most important classes in the class hierarchy and
922 some of the relations among the classes:
923
924 @ifnotinfo
925 @image{classhierarchy}
926 @end ifnotinfo
927 @ifinfo
928 <PICTURE MISSING>
929 @end ifinfo
930
931 The abstract classes shown here (the ones without drop-shadow) are of no
932 interest for the user.  They are used internally in order to avoid code
933 duplication if two or more classes derived from them share certain
934 features.  An example is @code{expairseq}, a container for a sequence of
935 pairs each consisting of one expression and a number (@code{numeric}).
936 What @emph{is} visible to the user are the derived classes @code{add}
937 and @code{mul}, representing sums and products.  @xref{Internal
938 structures}, where these two classes are described in more detail.  The
939 following table shortly summarizes what kinds of mathematical objects
940 are stored in the different classes:
941
942 @cartouche
943 @multitable @columnfractions .22 .78
944 @item @code{symbol} @tab Algebraic symbols @math{a}, @math{x}, @math{y}@dots{}
945 @item @code{constant} @tab Constants like 
946 @tex
947 $\pi$
948 @end tex
949 @ifnottex
950 @math{Pi}
951 @end ifnottex
952 @item @code{numeric} @tab All kinds of numbers, @math{42}, @math{7/3*I}, @math{3.14159}@dots{}
953 @item @code{add} @tab Sums like @math{x+y} or @math{a-(2*b)+3}
954 @item @code{mul} @tab Products like @math{x*y} or @math{2*a^2*(x+y+z)/b}
955 @item @code{ncmul} @tab Products of non-commutative objects
956 @item @code{power} @tab Exponentials such as @math{x^2}, @math{a^b}, 
957 @tex
958 $\sqrt{2}$
959 @end tex
960 @ifnottex
961 @code{sqrt(}@math{2}@code{)}
962 @end ifnottex
963 @dots{}
964 @item @code{pseries} @tab Power Series, e.g. @math{x-1/6*x^3+1/120*x^5+O(x^7)}
965 @item @code{function} @tab A symbolic function like
966 @tex
967 $\sin 2x$
968 @end tex
969 @ifnottex
970 @math{sin(2*x)}
971 @end ifnottex
972 @item @code{lst} @tab Lists of expressions @{@math{x}, @math{2*y}, @math{3+z}@}
973 @item @code{matrix} @tab @math{m}x@math{n} matrices of expressions
974 @item @code{relational} @tab A relation like the identity @math{x}@code{==}@math{y}
975 @item @code{indexed} @tab Indexed object like @math{A_ij}
976 @item @code{tensor} @tab Special tensor like the delta and metric tensors
977 @item @code{idx} @tab Index of an indexed object
978 @item @code{varidx} @tab Index with variance
979 @item @code{spinidx} @tab Index with variance and dot (used in Weyl-van-der-Waerden spinor formalism)
980 @item @code{wildcard} @tab Wildcard for pattern matching
981 @item @code{structure} @tab Template for user-defined classes
982 @end multitable
983 @end cartouche
984
985
986 @node Symbols, Numbers, The class hierarchy, Basic concepts
987 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
988 @section Symbols
989 @cindex @code{symbol} (class)
990 @cindex hierarchy of classes
991
992 @cindex atom
993 Symbolic indeterminates, or @dfn{symbols} for short, are for symbolic
994 manipulation what atoms are for chemistry.
995
996 A typical symbol definition looks like this:
997 @example
998 symbol x("x");
999 @end example
1000
1001 This definition actually contains three very different things:
1002 @itemize
1003 @item a C++ variable named @code{x}
1004 @item a @code{symbol} object stored in this C++ variable; this object
1005   represents the symbol in a GiNaC expression
1006 @item the string @code{"x"} which is the name of the symbol, used (almost)
1007   exclusively for printing expressions holding the symbol
1008 @end itemize
1009
1010 Symbols have an explicit name, supplied as a string during construction,
1011 because in C++, variable names can't be used as values, and the C++ compiler
1012 throws them away during compilation.
1013
1014 It is possible to omit the symbol name in the definition:
1015 @example
1016 symbol x;
1017 @end example
1018
1019 In this case, GiNaC will assign the symbol an internal, unique name of the
1020 form @code{symbolNNN}. This won't affect the usability of the symbol but
1021 the output of your calculations will become more readable if you give your
1022 symbols sensible names (for intermediate expressions that are only used
1023 internally such anonymous symbols can be quite useful, however).
1024
1025 Now, here is one important property of GiNaC that differentiates it from
1026 other computer algebra programs you may have used: GiNaC does @emph{not} use
1027 the names of symbols to tell them apart, but a (hidden) serial number that
1028 is unique for each newly created @code{symbol} object. If you want to use
1029 one and the same symbol in different places in your program, you must only
1030 create one @code{symbol} object and pass that around. If you create another
1031 symbol, even if it has the same name, GiNaC will treat it as a different
1032 indeterminate.
1033
1034 Observe:
1035 @example
1036 ex f(int n)
1037 @{
1038     symbol x("x");
1039     return pow(x, n);
1040 @}
1041
1042 int main()
1043 @{
1044     symbol x("x");
1045     ex e = f(6);
1046
1047     cout << e << endl;
1048      // prints "x^6" which looks right, but...
1049
1050     cout << e.degree(x) << endl;
1051      // ...this doesn't work. The symbol "x" here is different from the one
1052      // in f() and in the expression returned by f(). Consequently, it
1053      // prints "0".
1054 @}
1055 @end example
1056
1057 One possibility to ensure that @code{f()} and @code{main()} use the same
1058 symbol is to pass the symbol as an argument to @code{f()}:
1059 @example
1060 ex f(int n, const ex & x)
1061 @{
1062     return pow(x, n);
1063 @}
1064
1065 int main()
1066 @{
1067     symbol x("x");
1068
1069     // Now, f() uses the same symbol.
1070     ex e = f(6, x);
1071
1072     cout << e.degree(x) << endl;
1073      // prints "6", as expected
1074 @}
1075 @end example
1076
1077 Another possibility would be to define a global symbol @code{x} that is used
1078 by both @code{f()} and @code{main()}. If you are using global symbols and
1079 multiple compilation units you must take special care, however. Suppose
1080 that you have a header file @file{globals.h} in your program that defines
1081 a @code{symbol x("x");}. In this case, every unit that includes
1082 @file{globals.h} would also get its own definition of @code{x} (because
1083 header files are just inlined into the source code by the C++ preprocessor),
1084 and hence you would again end up with multiple equally-named, but different,
1085 symbols. Instead, the @file{globals.h} header should only contain a
1086 @emph{declaration} like @code{extern symbol x;}, with the definition of
1087 @code{x} moved into a C++ source file such as @file{globals.cpp}.
1088
1089 A different approach to ensuring that symbols used in different parts of
1090 your program are identical is to create them with a @emph{factory} function
1091 like this one:
1092 @example
1093 const symbol & get_symbol(const string & s)
1094 @{
1095     static map<string, symbol> directory;
1096     map<string, symbol>::iterator i = directory.find(s);
1097     if (i != directory.end())
1098         return i->second;
1099     else
1100         return directory.insert(make_pair(s, symbol(s))).first->second;
1101 @}
1102 @end example
1103
1104 This function returns one newly constructed symbol for each name that is
1105 passed in, and it returns the same symbol when called multiple times with
1106 the same name. Using this symbol factory, we can rewrite our example like
1107 this:
1108 @example
1109 ex f(int n)
1110 @{
1111     return pow(get_symbol("x"), n);
1112 @}
1113
1114 int main()
1115 @{
1116     ex e = f(6);
1117
1118     // Both calls of get_symbol("x") yield the same symbol.
1119     cout << e.degree(get_symbol("x")) << endl;
1120      // prints "6"
1121 @}
1122 @end example
1123
1124 Instead of creating symbols from strings we could also have
1125 @code{get_symbol()} take, for example, an integer number as its argument.
1126 In this case, we would probably want to give the generated symbols names
1127 that include this number, which can be accomplished with the help of an
1128 @code{ostringstream}.
1129
1130 In general, if you're getting weird results from GiNaC such as an expression
1131 @samp{x-x} that is not simplified to zero, you should check your symbol
1132 definitions.
1133
1134 As we said, the names of symbols primarily serve for purposes of expression
1135 output. But there are actually two instances where GiNaC uses the names for
1136 identifying symbols: When constructing an expression from a string, and when
1137 recreating an expression from an archive (@pxref{Input/output}).
1138
1139 In addition to its name, a symbol may contain a special string that is used
1140 in LaTeX output:
1141 @example
1142 symbol x("x", "\\Box");
1143 @end example
1144
1145 This creates a symbol that is printed as "@code{x}" in normal output, but
1146 as "@code{\Box}" in LaTeX code (@xref{Input/output}, for more
1147 information about the different output formats of expressions in GiNaC).
1148 GiNaC automatically creates proper LaTeX code for symbols having names of
1149 greek letters (@samp{alpha}, @samp{mu}, etc.). You can retrive the name
1150 and the LaTeX name of a symbol using the respective methods:
1151 @cindex @code{get_name()}
1152 @cindex @code{get_TeX_name()}
1153 @example
1154 symbol::get_name() const;
1155 symbol::get_TeX_name() const;
1156 @end example
1157
1158 @cindex @code{subs()}
1159 Symbols in GiNaC can't be assigned values. If you need to store results of
1160 calculations and give them a name, use C++ variables of type @code{ex}.
1161 If you want to replace a symbol in an expression with something else, you
1162 can invoke the expression's @code{.subs()} method
1163 (@pxref{Substituting expressions}).
1164
1165 @cindex @code{realsymbol()}
1166 By default, symbols are expected to stand in for complex values, i.e. they live
1167 in the complex domain.  As a consequence, operations like complex conjugation,
1168 for example (@pxref{Complex expressions}), do @emph{not} evaluate if applied
1169 to such symbols. Likewise @code{log(exp(x))} does not evaluate to @code{x},
1170 because of the unknown imaginary part of @code{x}.
1171 On the other hand, if you are sure that your symbols will hold only real
1172 values, you would like to have such functions evaluated. Therefore GiNaC
1173 allows you to specify
1174 the domain of the symbol. Instead of @code{symbol x("x");} you can write
1175 @code{realsymbol x("x");} to tell GiNaC that @code{x} stands in for real values.
1176
1177 @cindex @code{possymbol()}
1178 Furthermore, it is also possible to declare a symbol as positive. This will,
1179 for instance, enable the automatic simplification of @code{abs(x)} into 
1180 @code{x}. This is done by declaring the symbol as @code{possymbol x("x");}.
1181
1182
1183 @node Numbers, Constants, Symbols, Basic concepts
1184 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1185 @section Numbers
1186 @cindex @code{numeric} (class)
1187
1188 @cindex GMP
1189 @cindex CLN
1190 @cindex rational
1191 @cindex fraction
1192 For storing numerical things, GiNaC uses Bruno Haible's library CLN.
1193 The classes therein serve as foundation classes for GiNaC.  CLN stands
1194 for Class Library for Numbers or alternatively for Common Lisp Numbers.
1195 In order to find out more about CLN's internals, the reader is referred to
1196 the documentation of that library.  @inforef{Introduction, , cln}, for
1197 more information. Suffice to say that it is by itself build on top of
1198 another library, the GNU Multiple Precision library GMP, which is an
1199 extremely fast library for arbitrary long integers and rationals as well
1200 as arbitrary precision floating point numbers.  It is very commonly used
1201 by several popular cryptographic applications.  CLN extends GMP by
1202 several useful things: First, it introduces the complex number field
1203 over either reals (i.e. floating point numbers with arbitrary precision)
1204 or rationals.  Second, it automatically converts rationals to integers
1205 if the denominator is unity and complex numbers to real numbers if the
1206 imaginary part vanishes and also correctly treats algebraic functions.
1207 Third it provides good implementations of state-of-the-art algorithms
1208 for all trigonometric and hyperbolic functions as well as for
1209 calculation of some useful constants.
1210
1211 The user can construct an object of class @code{numeric} in several
1212 ways.  The following example shows the four most important constructors.
1213 It uses construction from C-integer, construction of fractions from two
1214 integers, construction from C-float and construction from a string:
1215
1216 @example
1217 #include <iostream>
1218 #include <ginac/ginac.h>
1219 using namespace GiNaC;
1220
1221 int main()
1222 @{
1223     numeric two = 2;                      // exact integer 2
1224     numeric r(2,3);                       // exact fraction 2/3
1225     numeric e(2.71828);                   // floating point number
1226     numeric p = "3.14159265358979323846"; // constructor from string
1227     // Trott's constant in scientific notation:
1228     numeric trott("1.0841015122311136151E-2");
1229     
1230     std::cout << two*p << std::endl;  // floating point 6.283...
1231     ...
1232 @end example
1233
1234 @cindex @code{I}
1235 @cindex complex numbers
1236 The imaginary unit in GiNaC is a predefined @code{numeric} object with the
1237 name @code{I}:
1238
1239 @example
1240     ...
1241     numeric z1 = 2-3*I;                    // exact complex number 2-3i
1242     numeric z2 = 5.9+1.6*I;                // complex floating point number
1243 @}
1244 @end example
1245
1246 It may be tempting to construct fractions by writing @code{numeric r(3/2)}.
1247 This would, however, call C's built-in operator @code{/} for integers
1248 first and result in a numeric holding a plain integer 1.  @strong{Never
1249 use the operator @code{/} on integers} unless you know exactly what you
1250 are doing!  Use the constructor from two integers instead, as shown in
1251 the example above.  Writing @code{numeric(1)/2} may look funny but works
1252 also.
1253
1254 @cindex @code{Digits}
1255 @cindex accuracy
1256 We have seen now the distinction between exact numbers and floating
1257 point numbers.  Clearly, the user should never have to worry about
1258 dynamically created exact numbers, since their `exactness' always
1259 determines how they ought to be handled, i.e. how `long' they are.  The
1260 situation is different for floating point numbers.  Their accuracy is
1261 controlled by one @emph{global} variable, called @code{Digits}.  (For
1262 those readers who know about Maple: it behaves very much like Maple's
1263 @code{Digits}).  All objects of class numeric that are constructed from
1264 then on will be stored with a precision matching that number of decimal
1265 digits:
1266
1267 @example
1268 #include <iostream>
1269 #include <ginac/ginac.h>
1270 using namespace std;
1271 using namespace GiNaC;
1272
1273 void foo()
1274 @{
1275     numeric three(3.0), one(1.0);
1276     numeric x = one/three;
1277
1278     cout << "in " << Digits << " digits:" << endl;
1279     cout << x << endl;
1280     cout << Pi.evalf() << endl;
1281 @}
1282
1283 int main()
1284 @{
1285     foo();
1286     Digits = 60;
1287     foo();
1288     return 0;
1289 @}
1290 @end example
1291
1292 The above example prints the following output to screen:
1293
1294 @example
1295 in 17 digits:
1296 0.33333333333333333334
1297 3.1415926535897932385
1298 in 60 digits:
1299 0.33333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333334
1300 3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971693993751058209749445923078
1301 @end example
1302
1303 @cindex rounding
1304 Note that the last number is not necessarily rounded as you would
1305 naively expect it to be rounded in the decimal system.  But note also,
1306 that in both cases you got a couple of extra digits.  This is because
1307 numbers are internally stored by CLN as chunks of binary digits in order
1308 to match your machine's word size and to not waste precision.  Thus, on
1309 architectures with different word size, the above output might even
1310 differ with regard to actually computed digits.
1311
1312 It should be clear that objects of class @code{numeric} should be used
1313 for constructing numbers or for doing arithmetic with them.  The objects
1314 one deals with most of the time are the polymorphic expressions @code{ex}.
1315
1316 @subsection Tests on numbers
1317
1318 Once you have declared some numbers, assigned them to expressions and
1319 done some arithmetic with them it is frequently desired to retrieve some
1320 kind of information from them like asking whether that number is
1321 integer, rational, real or complex.  For those cases GiNaC provides
1322 several useful methods.  (Internally, they fall back to invocations of
1323 certain CLN functions.)
1324
1325 As an example, let's construct some rational number, multiply it with
1326 some multiple of its denominator and test what comes out:
1327
1328 @example
1329 #include <iostream>
1330 #include <ginac/ginac.h>
1331 using namespace std;
1332 using namespace GiNaC;
1333
1334 // some very important constants:
1335 const numeric twentyone(21);
1336 const numeric ten(10);
1337 const numeric five(5);
1338
1339 int main()
1340 @{
1341     numeric answer = twentyone;
1342
1343     answer /= five;
1344     cout << answer.is_integer() << endl;  // false, it's 21/5
1345     answer *= ten;
1346     cout << answer.is_integer() << endl;  // true, it's 42 now!
1347 @}
1348 @end example
1349
1350 Note that the variable @code{answer} is constructed here as an integer
1351 by @code{numeric}'s copy constructor, but in an intermediate step it
1352 holds a rational number represented as integer numerator and integer
1353 denominator.  When multiplied by 10, the denominator becomes unity and
1354 the result is automatically converted to a pure integer again.
1355 Internally, the underlying CLN is responsible for this behavior and we
1356 refer the reader to CLN's documentation.  Suffice to say that
1357 the same behavior applies to complex numbers as well as return values of
1358 certain functions.  Complex numbers are automatically converted to real
1359 numbers if the imaginary part becomes zero.  The full set of tests that
1360 can be applied is listed in the following table.
1361
1362 @cartouche
1363 @multitable @columnfractions .30 .70
1364 @item @strong{Method} @tab @strong{Returns true if the object is@dots{}}
1365 @item @code{.is_zero()}
1366 @tab @dots{}equal to zero
1367 @item @code{.is_positive()}
1368 @tab @dots{}not complex and greater than 0
1369 @item @code{.is_negative()}
1370 @tab @dots{}not complex and smaller than 0
1371 @item @code{.is_integer()}
1372 @tab @dots{}a (non-complex) integer
1373 @item @code{.is_pos_integer()}
1374 @tab @dots{}an integer and greater than 0
1375 @item @code{.is_nonneg_integer()}
1376 @tab @dots{}an integer and greater equal 0
1377 @item @code{.is_even()}
1378 @tab @dots{}an even integer
1379 @item @code{.is_odd()}
1380 @tab @dots{}an odd integer
1381 @item @code{.is_prime()}
1382 @tab @dots{}a prime integer (probabilistic primality test)
1383 @item @code{.is_rational()}
1384 @tab @dots{}an exact rational number (integers are rational, too)
1385 @item @code{.is_real()}
1386 @tab @dots{}a real integer, rational or float (i.e. is not complex)
1387 @item @code{.is_cinteger()}
1388 @tab @dots{}a (complex) integer (such as @math{2-3*I})
1389 @item @code{.is_crational()}
1390 @tab @dots{}an exact (complex) rational number (such as @math{2/3+7/2*I})
1391 @end multitable
1392 @end cartouche
1393
1394 @page
1395
1396 @subsection Numeric functions
1397
1398 The following functions can be applied to @code{numeric} objects and will be
1399 evaluated immediately:
1400
1401 @cartouche
1402 @multitable @columnfractions .30 .70
1403 @item @strong{Name} @tab @strong{Function}
1404 @item @code{inverse(z)}
1405 @tab returns @math{1/z}
1406 @cindex @code{inverse()} (numeric)
1407 @item @code{pow(a, b)}
1408 @tab exponentiation @math{a^b}
1409 @item @code{abs(z)}
1410 @tab absolute value
1411 @item @code{real(z)}
1412 @tab real part
1413 @cindex @code{real()}
1414 @item @code{imag(z)}
1415 @tab imaginary part
1416 @cindex @code{imag()}
1417 @item @code{csgn(z)}
1418 @tab complex sign (returns an @code{int})
1419 @item @code{step(x)}
1420 @tab step function (returns an @code{numeric})
1421 @item @code{numer(z)}
1422 @tab numerator of rational or complex rational number
1423 @item @code{denom(z)}
1424 @tab denominator of rational or complex rational number
1425 @item @code{sqrt(z)}
1426 @tab square root
1427 @item @code{isqrt(n)}
1428 @tab integer square root
1429 @cindex @code{isqrt()}
1430 @item @code{sin(z)}
1431 @tab sine
1432 @item @code{cos(z)}
1433 @tab cosine
1434 @item @code{tan(z)}
1435 @tab tangent
1436 @item @code{asin(z)}
1437 @tab inverse sine
1438 @item @code{acos(z)}
1439 @tab inverse cosine
1440 @item @code{atan(z)}
1441 @tab inverse tangent
1442 @item @code{atan(y, x)}
1443 @tab inverse tangent with two arguments
1444 @item @code{sinh(z)}
1445 @tab hyperbolic sine
1446 @item @code{cosh(z)}
1447 @tab hyperbolic cosine
1448 @item @code{tanh(z)}
1449 @tab hyperbolic tangent
1450 @item @code{asinh(z)}
1451 @tab inverse hyperbolic sine
1452 @item @code{acosh(z)}
1453 @tab inverse hyperbolic cosine
1454 @item @code{atanh(z)}
1455 @tab inverse hyperbolic tangent
1456 @item @code{exp(z)}
1457 @tab exponential function
1458 @item @code{log(z)}
1459 @tab natural logarithm
1460 @item @code{Li2(z)}
1461 @tab dilogarithm
1462 @item @code{zeta(z)}
1463 @tab Riemann's zeta function
1464 @item @code{tgamma(z)}
1465 @tab gamma function
1466 @item @code{lgamma(z)}
1467 @tab logarithm of gamma function
1468 @item @code{psi(z)}
1469 @tab psi (digamma) function
1470 @item @code{psi(n, z)}
1471 @tab derivatives of psi function (polygamma functions)
1472 @item @code{factorial(n)}
1473 @tab factorial function @math{n!}
1474 @item @code{doublefactorial(n)}
1475 @tab double factorial function @math{n!!}
1476 @cindex @code{doublefactorial()}
1477 @item @code{binomial(n, k)}
1478 @tab binomial coefficients
1479 @item @code{bernoulli(n)}
1480 @tab Bernoulli numbers
1481 @cindex @code{bernoulli()}
1482 @item @code{fibonacci(n)}
1483 @tab Fibonacci numbers
1484 @cindex @code{fibonacci()}
1485 @item @code{mod(a, b)}
1486 @tab modulus in positive representation (in the range @code{[0, abs(b)-1]} with the sign of b, or zero)
1487 @cindex @code{mod()}
1488 @item @code{smod(a, b)}
1489 @tab modulus in symmetric representation (in the range @code{[-iquo(abs(b), 2), iquo(abs(b), 2)]})
1490 @cindex @code{smod()}
1491 @item @code{irem(a, b)}
1492 @tab integer remainder (has the sign of @math{a}, or is zero)
1493 @cindex @code{irem()}
1494 @item @code{irem(a, b, q)}
1495 @tab integer remainder and quotient, @code{irem(a, b, q) == a-q*b}
1496 @item @code{iquo(a, b)}
1497 @tab integer quotient
1498 @cindex @code{iquo()}
1499 @item @code{iquo(a, b, r)}
1500 @tab integer quotient and remainder, @code{r == a-iquo(a, b)*b}
1501 @item @code{gcd(a, b)}
1502 @tab greatest common divisor
1503 @item @code{lcm(a, b)}
1504 @tab least common multiple
1505 @end multitable
1506 @end cartouche
1507
1508 Most of these functions are also available as symbolic functions that can be
1509 used in expressions (@pxref{Mathematical functions}) or, like @code{gcd()},
1510 as polynomial algorithms.
1511
1512 @subsection Converting numbers
1513
1514 Sometimes it is desirable to convert a @code{numeric} object back to a
1515 built-in arithmetic type (@code{int}, @code{double}, etc.). The @code{numeric}
1516 class provides a couple of methods for this purpose:
1517
1518 @cindex @code{to_int()}
1519 @cindex @code{to_long()}
1520 @cindex @code{to_double()}
1521 @cindex @code{to_cl_N()}
1522 @example
1523 int numeric::to_int() const;
1524 long numeric::to_long() const;
1525 double numeric::to_double() const;
1526 cln::cl_N numeric::to_cl_N() const;
1527 @end example
1528
1529 @code{to_int()} and @code{to_long()} only work when the number they are
1530 applied on is an exact integer. Otherwise the program will halt with a
1531 message like @samp{Not a 32-bit integer}. @code{to_double()} applied on a
1532 rational number will return a floating-point approximation. Both
1533 @code{to_int()/to_long()} and @code{to_double()} discard the imaginary
1534 part of complex numbers.
1535
1536
1537 @node Constants, Fundamental containers, Numbers, Basic concepts
1538 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1539 @section Constants
1540 @cindex @code{constant} (class)
1541
1542 @cindex @code{Pi}
1543 @cindex @code{Catalan}
1544 @cindex @code{Euler}
1545 @cindex @code{evalf()}
1546 Constants behave pretty much like symbols except that they return some
1547 specific number when the method @code{.evalf()} is called.
1548
1549 The predefined known constants are:
1550
1551 @cartouche
1552 @multitable @columnfractions .14 .32 .54
1553 @item @strong{Name} @tab @strong{Common Name} @tab @strong{Numerical Value (to 35 digits)}
1554 @item @code{Pi}
1555 @tab Archimedes' constant
1556 @tab 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288
1557 @item @code{Catalan}
1558 @tab Catalan's constant
1559 @tab 0.91596559417721901505460351493238411
1560 @item @code{Euler}
1561 @tab Euler's (or Euler-Mascheroni) constant
1562 @tab 0.57721566490153286060651209008240243
1563 @end multitable
1564 @end cartouche
1565
1566
1567 @node Fundamental containers, Lists, Constants, Basic concepts
1568 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1569 @section Sums, products and powers
1570 @cindex polynomial
1571 @cindex @code{add}
1572 @cindex @code{mul}
1573 @cindex @code{power}
1574
1575 Simple rational expressions are written down in GiNaC pretty much like
1576 in other CAS or like expressions involving numerical variables in C.
1577 The necessary operators @code{+}, @code{-}, @code{*} and @code{/} have
1578 been overloaded to achieve this goal.  When you run the following
1579 code snippet, the constructor for an object of type @code{mul} is
1580 automatically called to hold the product of @code{a} and @code{b} and
1581 then the constructor for an object of type @code{add} is called to hold
1582 the sum of that @code{mul} object and the number one:
1583
1584 @example
1585     ...
1586     symbol a("a"), b("b");
1587     ex MyTerm = 1+a*b;
1588     ...
1589 @end example
1590
1591 @cindex @code{pow()}
1592 For exponentiation, you have already seen the somewhat clumsy (though C-ish)
1593 statement @code{pow(x,2);} to represent @code{x} squared.  This direct
1594 construction is necessary since we cannot safely overload the constructor
1595 @code{^} in C++ to construct a @code{power} object.  If we did, it would
1596 have several counterintuitive and undesired effects:
1597
1598 @itemize @bullet
1599 @item
1600 Due to C's operator precedence, @code{2*x^2} would be parsed as @code{(2*x)^2}.
1601 @item
1602 Due to the binding of the operator @code{^}, @code{x^a^b} would result in
1603 @code{(x^a)^b}. This would be confusing since most (though not all) other CAS
1604 interpret this as @code{x^(a^b)}.
1605 @item
1606 Also, expressions involving integer exponents are very frequently used,
1607 which makes it even more dangerous to overload @code{^} since it is then
1608 hard to distinguish between the semantics as exponentiation and the one
1609 for exclusive or.  (It would be embarrassing to return @code{1} where one
1610 has requested @code{2^3}.)
1611 @end itemize
1612
1613 @cindex @command{ginsh}
1614 All effects are contrary to mathematical notation and differ from the
1615 way most other CAS handle exponentiation, therefore overloading @code{^}
1616 is ruled out for GiNaC's C++ part.  The situation is different in
1617 @command{ginsh}, there the exponentiation-@code{^} exists.  (Also note
1618 that the other frequently used exponentiation operator @code{**} does
1619 not exist at all in C++).
1620
1621 To be somewhat more precise, objects of the three classes described
1622 here, are all containers for other expressions.  An object of class
1623 @code{power} is best viewed as a container with two slots, one for the
1624 basis, one for the exponent.  All valid GiNaC expressions can be
1625 inserted.  However, basic transformations like simplifying
1626 @code{pow(pow(x,2),3)} to @code{x^6} automatically are only performed
1627 when this is mathematically possible.  If we replace the outer exponent
1628 three in the example by some symbols @code{a}, the simplification is not
1629 safe and will not be performed, since @code{a} might be @code{1/2} and
1630 @code{x} negative.
1631
1632 Objects of type @code{add} and @code{mul} are containers with an
1633 arbitrary number of slots for expressions to be inserted.  Again, simple
1634 and safe simplifications are carried out like transforming
1635 @code{3*x+4-x} to @code{2*x+4}.
1636
1637
1638 @node Lists, Mathematical functions, Fundamental containers, Basic concepts
1639 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1640 @section Lists of expressions
1641 @cindex @code{lst} (class)
1642 @cindex lists
1643 @cindex @code{nops()}
1644 @cindex @code{op()}
1645 @cindex @code{append()}
1646 @cindex @code{prepend()}
1647 @cindex @code{remove_first()}
1648 @cindex @code{remove_last()}
1649 @cindex @code{remove_all()}
1650
1651 The GiNaC class @code{lst} serves for holding a @dfn{list} of arbitrary
1652 expressions. They are not as ubiquitous as in many other computer algebra
1653 packages, but are sometimes used to supply a variable number of arguments of
1654 the same type to GiNaC methods such as @code{subs()} and some @code{matrix}
1655 constructors, so you should have a basic understanding of them.
1656
1657 Lists can be constructed from an initializer list of expressions:
1658
1659 @example
1660 @{
1661     symbol x("x"), y("y");
1662     lst l;
1663     l = @{x, 2, y, x+y@};
1664     // now, l is a list holding the expressions 'x', '2', 'y', and 'x+y',
1665     // in that order
1666     ...
1667 @end example
1668
1669 Use the @code{nops()} method to determine the size (number of expressions) of
1670 a list and the @code{op()} method or the @code{[]} operator to access
1671 individual elements:
1672
1673 @example
1674     ...
1675     cout << l.nops() << endl;                // prints '4'
1676     cout << l.op(2) << " " << l[0] << endl;  // prints 'y x'
1677     ...
1678 @end example
1679
1680 As with the standard @code{list<T>} container, accessing random elements of a
1681 @code{lst} is generally an operation of order @math{O(N)}. Faster read-only
1682 sequential access to the elements of a list is possible with the
1683 iterator types provided by the @code{lst} class:
1684
1685 @example
1686 typedef ... lst::const_iterator;
1687 typedef ... lst::const_reverse_iterator;
1688 lst::const_iterator lst::begin() const;
1689 lst::const_iterator lst::end() const;
1690 lst::const_reverse_iterator lst::rbegin() const;
1691 lst::const_reverse_iterator lst::rend() const;
1692 @end example
1693
1694 For example, to print the elements of a list individually you can use:
1695
1696 @example
1697     ...
1698     // O(N)
1699     for (lst::const_iterator i = l.begin(); i != l.end(); ++i)
1700         cout << *i << endl;
1701     ...
1702 @end example
1703
1704 which is one order faster than
1705
1706 @example
1707     ...
1708     // O(N^2)
1709     for (size_t i = 0; i < l.nops(); ++i)
1710         cout << l.op(i) << endl;
1711     ...
1712 @end example
1713
1714 These iterators also allow you to use some of the algorithms provided by
1715 the C++ standard library:
1716
1717 @example
1718     ...
1719     // print the elements of the list (requires #include <iterator>)
1720     std::copy(l.begin(), l.end(), ostream_iterator<ex>(cout, "\n"));
1721
1722     // sum up the elements of the list (requires #include <numeric>)
1723     ex sum = std::accumulate(l.begin(), l.end(), ex(0));
1724     cout << sum << endl;  // prints '2+2*x+2*y'
1725     ...
1726 @end example
1727
1728 @code{lst} is one of the few GiNaC classes that allow in-place modifications
1729 (the only other one is @code{matrix}). You can modify single elements:
1730
1731 @example
1732     ...
1733     l[1] = 42;       // l is now @{x, 42, y, x+y@}
1734     l.let_op(1) = 7; // l is now @{x, 7, y, x+y@}
1735     ...
1736 @end example
1737
1738 You can append or prepend an expression to a list with the @code{append()}
1739 and @code{prepend()} methods:
1740
1741 @example
1742     ...
1743     l.append(4*x);   // l is now @{x, 7, y, x+y, 4*x@}
1744     l.prepend(0);    // l is now @{0, x, 7, y, x+y, 4*x@}
1745     ...
1746 @end example
1747
1748 You can remove the first or last element of a list with @code{remove_first()}
1749 and @code{remove_last()}:
1750
1751 @example
1752     ...
1753     l.remove_first();   // l is now @{x, 7, y, x+y, 4*x@}
1754     l.remove_last();    // l is now @{x, 7, y, x+y@}
1755     ...
1756 @end example
1757
1758 You can remove all the elements of a list with @code{remove_all()}:
1759
1760 @example
1761     ...
1762     l.remove_all();     // l is now empty
1763     ...
1764 @end example
1765
1766 You can bring the elements of a list into a canonical order with @code{sort()}:
1767
1768 @example
1769     ...
1770     lst l1, l2;
1771     l1 = x, 2, y, x+y;
1772     l2 = 2, x+y, x, y;
1773     l1.sort();
1774     l2.sort();
1775     // l1 and l2 are now equal
1776     ...
1777 @end example
1778
1779 Finally, you can remove all but the first element of consecutive groups of
1780 elements with @code{unique()}:
1781
1782 @example
1783     ...
1784     lst l3;
1785     l3 = x, 2, 2, 2, y, x+y, y+x;
1786     l3.unique();        // l3 is now @{x, 2, y, x+y@}
1787 @}
1788 @end example
1789
1790
1791 @node Mathematical functions, Relations, Lists, Basic concepts
1792 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1793 @section Mathematical functions
1794 @cindex @code{function} (class)
1795 @cindex trigonometric function
1796 @cindex hyperbolic function
1797
1798 There are quite a number of useful functions hard-wired into GiNaC.  For
1799 instance, all trigonometric and hyperbolic functions are implemented
1800 (@xref{Built-in functions}, for a complete list).
1801
1802 These functions (better called @emph{pseudofunctions}) are all objects
1803 of class @code{function}.  They accept one or more expressions as
1804 arguments and return one expression.  If the arguments are not
1805 numerical, the evaluation of the function may be halted, as it does in
1806 the next example, showing how a function returns itself twice and
1807 finally an expression that may be really useful:
1808
1809 @cindex Gamma function
1810 @cindex @code{subs()}
1811 @example
1812     ...
1813     symbol x("x"), y("y");    
1814     ex foo = x+y/2;
1815     cout << tgamma(foo) << endl;
1816      // -> tgamma(x+(1/2)*y)
1817     ex bar = foo.subs(y==1);
1818     cout << tgamma(bar) << endl;
1819      // -> tgamma(x+1/2)
1820     ex foobar = bar.subs(x==7);
1821     cout << tgamma(foobar) << endl;
1822      // -> (135135/128)*Pi^(1/2)
1823     ...
1824 @end example
1825
1826 Besides evaluation most of these functions allow differentiation, series
1827 expansion and so on.  Read the next chapter in order to learn more about
1828 this.
1829
1830 It must be noted that these pseudofunctions are created by inline
1831 functions, where the argument list is templated.  This means that
1832 whenever you call @code{GiNaC::sin(1)} it is equivalent to
1833 @code{sin(ex(1))} and will therefore not result in a floating point
1834 number.  Unless of course the function prototype is explicitly
1835 overridden -- which is the case for arguments of type @code{numeric}
1836 (not wrapped inside an @code{ex}).  Hence, in order to obtain a floating
1837 point number of class @code{numeric} you should call
1838 @code{sin(numeric(1))}.  This is almost the same as calling
1839 @code{sin(1).evalf()} except that the latter will return a numeric
1840 wrapped inside an @code{ex}.
1841
1842
1843 @node Relations, Integrals, Mathematical functions, Basic concepts
1844 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1845 @section Relations
1846 @cindex @code{relational} (class)
1847
1848 Sometimes, a relation holding between two expressions must be stored
1849 somehow.  The class @code{relational} is a convenient container for such
1850 purposes.  A relation is by definition a container for two @code{ex} and
1851 a relation between them that signals equality, inequality and so on.
1852 They are created by simply using the C++ operators @code{==}, @code{!=},
1853 @code{<}, @code{<=}, @code{>} and @code{>=} between two expressions.
1854
1855 @xref{Mathematical functions}, for examples where various applications
1856 of the @code{.subs()} method show how objects of class relational are
1857 used as arguments.  There they provide an intuitive syntax for
1858 substitutions.  They are also used as arguments to the @code{ex::series}
1859 method, where the left hand side of the relation specifies the variable
1860 to expand in and the right hand side the expansion point.  They can also
1861 be used for creating systems of equations that are to be solved for
1862 unknown variables.  But the most common usage of objects of this class
1863 is rather inconspicuous in statements of the form @code{if
1864 (expand(pow(a+b,2))==a*a+2*a*b+b*b) @{...@}}.  Here, an implicit
1865 conversion from @code{relational} to @code{bool} takes place.  Note,
1866 however, that @code{==} here does not perform any simplifications, hence
1867 @code{expand()} must be called explicitly.
1868
1869 @node Integrals, Matrices, Relations, Basic concepts
1870 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1871 @section Integrals
1872 @cindex @code{integral} (class)
1873
1874 An object of class @dfn{integral} can be used to hold a symbolic integral.
1875 If you want to symbolically represent the integral of @code{x*x} from 0 to
1876 1, you would write this as
1877 @example
1878 integral(x, 0, 1, x*x)
1879 @end example
1880 The first argument is the integration variable. It should be noted that
1881 GiNaC is not very good (yet?) at symbolically evaluating integrals. In
1882 fact, it can only integrate polynomials. An expression containing integrals
1883 can be evaluated symbolically by calling the
1884 @example
1885 .eval_integ()
1886 @end example
1887 method on it. Numerical evaluation is available by calling the
1888 @example
1889 .evalf()
1890 @end example
1891 method on an expression containing the integral. This will only evaluate
1892 integrals into a number if @code{subs}ing the integration variable by a
1893 number in the fourth argument of an integral and then @code{evalf}ing the
1894 result always results in a number. Of course, also the boundaries of the
1895 integration domain must @code{evalf} into numbers. It should be noted that
1896 trying to @code{evalf} a function with discontinuities in the integration
1897 domain is not recommended. The accuracy of the numeric evaluation of
1898 integrals is determined by the static member variable
1899 @example
1900 ex integral::relative_integration_error
1901 @end example
1902 of the class @code{integral}. The default value of this is 10^-8.
1903 The integration works by halving the interval of integration, until numeric
1904 stability of the answer indicates that the requested accuracy has been
1905 reached. The maximum depth of the halving can be set via the static member
1906 variable
1907 @example
1908 int integral::max_integration_level
1909 @end example
1910 The default value is 15. If this depth is exceeded, @code{evalf} will simply
1911 return the integral unevaluated. The function that performs the numerical
1912 evaluation, is also available as
1913 @example
1914 ex adaptivesimpson(const ex & x, const ex & a, const ex & b, const ex & f,
1915                    const ex & error)
1916 @end example
1917 This function will throw an exception if the maximum depth is exceeded. The
1918 last parameter of the function is optional and defaults to the
1919 @code{relative_integration_error}. To make sure that we do not do too
1920 much work if an expression contains the same integral multiple times,
1921 a lookup table is used.
1922
1923 If you know that an expression holds an integral, you can get the
1924 integration variable, the left boundary, right boundary and integrand by
1925 respectively calling @code{.op(0)}, @code{.op(1)}, @code{.op(2)}, and
1926 @code{.op(3)}. Differentiating integrals with respect to variables works
1927 as expected. Note that it makes no sense to differentiate an integral
1928 with respect to the integration variable.
1929
1930 @node Matrices, Indexed objects, Integrals, Basic concepts
1931 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
1932 @section Matrices
1933 @cindex @code{matrix} (class)
1934
1935 A @dfn{matrix} is a two-dimensional array of expressions. The elements of a
1936 matrix with @math{m} rows and @math{n} columns are accessed with two
1937 @code{unsigned} indices, the first one in the range 0@dots{}@math{m-1}, the
1938 second one in the range 0@dots{}@math{n-1}.
1939
1940 There are a couple of ways to construct matrices, with or without preset
1941 elements. The constructor
1942
1943 @example
1944 matrix::matrix(unsigned r, unsigned c);
1945 @end example
1946
1947 creates a matrix with @samp{r} rows and @samp{c} columns with all elements
1948 set to zero.
1949
1950 The easiest way to create a matrix is using an initializer list of
1951 initializer lists, all of the same size:
1952
1953 @example
1954 @{
1955     matrix m = @{@{1, -a@},
1956                 @{a,  1@}@};
1957 @}
1958 @end example
1959
1960 You can also specify the elements as a (flat) list with
1961
1962 @example
1963 matrix::matrix(unsigned r, unsigned c, const lst & l);
1964 @end example
1965
1966 The function
1967
1968 @cindex @code{lst_to_matrix()}
1969 @example
1970 ex lst_to_matrix(const lst & l);
1971 @end example
1972
1973 constructs a matrix from a list of lists, each list representing a matrix row.
1974
1975 There is also a set of functions for creating some special types of
1976 matrices:
1977
1978 @cindex @code{diag_matrix()}
1979 @cindex @code{unit_matrix()}
1980 @cindex @code{symbolic_matrix()}
1981 @example
1982 ex diag_matrix(const lst & l);
1983 ex diag_matrix(initializer_list<ex> l);
1984 ex unit_matrix(unsigned x);
1985 ex unit_matrix(unsigned r, unsigned c);
1986 ex symbolic_matrix(unsigned r, unsigned c, const string & base_name);
1987 ex symbolic_matrix(unsigned r, unsigned c, const string & base_name,
1988                    const string & tex_base_name);
1989 @end example
1990
1991 @code{diag_matrix()} constructs a square diagonal matrix given the diagonal
1992 elements. @code{unit_matrix()} creates an @samp{x} by @samp{x} (or @samp{r}
1993 by @samp{c}) unit matrix. And finally, @code{symbolic_matrix} constructs a
1994 matrix filled with newly generated symbols made of the specified base name
1995 and the position of each element in the matrix.
1996
1997 Matrices often arise by omitting elements of another matrix. For
1998 instance, the submatrix @code{S} of a matrix @code{M} takes a
1999 rectangular block from @code{M}. The reduced matrix @code{R} is defined
2000 by removing one row and one column from a matrix @code{M}. (The
2001 determinant of a reduced matrix is called a @emph{Minor} of @code{M} and
2002 can be used for computing the inverse using Cramer's rule.)
2003
2004 @cindex @code{sub_matrix()}
2005 @cindex @code{reduced_matrix()}
2006 @example
2007 ex sub_matrix(const matrix&m, unsigned r, unsigned nr, unsigned c, unsigned nc);
2008 ex reduced_matrix(const matrix& m, unsigned r, unsigned c);
2009 @end example
2010
2011 The function @code{sub_matrix()} takes a row offset @code{r} and a
2012 column offset @code{c} and takes a block of @code{nr} rows and @code{nc}
2013 columns. The function @code{reduced_matrix()} has two integer arguments
2014 that specify which row and column to remove:
2015
2016 @example
2017 @{
2018     matrix m = @{@{11, 12, 13@},
2019                 @{21, 22, 23@},
2020                 @{31, 32, 33@}@};
2021     cout << reduced_matrix(m, 1, 1) << endl;
2022     // -> [[11,13],[31,33]]
2023     cout << sub_matrix(m, 1, 2, 1, 2) << endl;
2024     // -> [[22,23],[32,33]]
2025 @}
2026 @end example
2027
2028 Matrix elements can be accessed and set using the parenthesis (function call)
2029 operator:
2030
2031 @example
2032 const ex & matrix::operator()(unsigned r, unsigned c) const;
2033 ex & matrix::operator()(unsigned r, unsigned c);
2034 @end example
2035
2036 It is also possible to access the matrix elements in a linear fashion with
2037 the @code{op()} method. But C++-style subscripting with square brackets
2038 @samp{[]} is not available.
2039
2040 Here are a couple of examples for constructing matrices:
2041
2042 @example
2043 @{
2044     symbol a("a"), b("b");
2045
2046     matrix M = @{@{a, 0@},
2047                 @{0, b@}@};
2048     cout << M << endl;
2049      // -> [[a,0],[0,b]]
2050
2051     matrix M2(2, 2);
2052     M2(0, 0) = a;
2053     M2(1, 1) = b;
2054     cout << M2 << endl;
2055      // -> [[a,0],[0,b]]
2056
2057     cout << matrix(2, 2, lst@{a, 0, 0, b@}) << endl;
2058      // -> [[a,0],[0,b]]
2059
2060     cout << lst_to_matrix(lst@{lst@{a, 0@}, lst@{0, b@}@}) << endl;
2061      // -> [[a,0],[0,b]]
2062
2063     cout << diag_matrix(lst@{a, b@}) << endl;
2064      // -> [[a,0],[0,b]]
2065
2066     cout << unit_matrix(3) << endl;
2067      // -> [[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]]
2068
2069     cout << symbolic_matrix(2, 3, "x") << endl;
2070      // -> [[x00,x01,x02],[x10,x11,x12]]
2071 @}
2072 @end example
2073
2074 @cindex @code{is_zero_matrix()} 
2075 The method @code{matrix::is_zero_matrix()} returns @code{true} only if
2076 all entries of the matrix are zeros. There is also method
2077 @code{ex::is_zero_matrix()} which returns @code{true} only if the
2078 expression is zero or a zero matrix.
2079
2080 @cindex @code{transpose()}
2081 There are three ways to do arithmetic with matrices. The first (and most
2082 direct one) is to use the methods provided by the @code{matrix} class:
2083
2084 @example
2085 matrix matrix::add(const matrix & other) const;
2086 matrix matrix::sub(const matrix & other) const;
2087 matrix matrix::mul(const matrix & other) const;
2088 matrix matrix::mul_scalar(const ex & other) const;
2089 matrix matrix::pow(const ex & expn) const;
2090 matrix matrix::transpose() const;
2091 @end example
2092
2093 All of these methods return the result as a new matrix object. Here is an
2094 example that calculates @math{A*B-2*C} for three matrices @math{A}, @math{B}
2095 and @math{C}:
2096
2097 @example
2098 @{
2099     matrix A = @{@{ 1, 2@},
2100                 @{ 3, 4@}@};
2101     matrix B = @{@{-1, 0@},
2102                 @{ 2, 1@}@};
2103     matrix C = @{@{ 8, 4@},
2104                 @{ 2, 1@}@};
2105
2106     matrix result = A.mul(B).sub(C.mul_scalar(2));
2107     cout << result << endl;
2108      // -> [[-13,-6],[1,2]]
2109     ...
2110 @}
2111 @end example
2112
2113 @cindex @code{evalm()}
2114 The second (and probably the most natural) way is to construct an expression
2115 containing matrices with the usual arithmetic operators and @code{pow()}.
2116 For efficiency reasons, expressions with sums, products and powers of
2117 matrices are not automatically evaluated in GiNaC. You have to call the
2118 method
2119
2120 @example
2121 ex ex::evalm() const;
2122 @end example
2123
2124 to obtain the result:
2125
2126 @example
2127 @{
2128     ...
2129     ex e = A*B - 2*C;
2130     cout << e << endl;
2131      // -> [[1,2],[3,4]]*[[-1,0],[2,1]]-2*[[8,4],[2,1]]
2132     cout << e.evalm() << endl;
2133      // -> [[-13,-6],[1,2]]
2134     ...
2135 @}
2136 @end example
2137
2138 The non-commutativity of the product @code{A*B} in this example is
2139 automatically recognized by GiNaC. There is no need to use a special
2140 operator here. @xref{Non-commutative objects}, for more information about
2141 dealing with non-commutative expressions.
2142
2143 Finally, you can work with indexed matrices and call @code{simplify_indexed()}
2144 to perform the arithmetic:
2145
2146 @example
2147 @{
2148     ...
2149     idx i(symbol("i"), 2), j(symbol("j"), 2), k(symbol("k"), 2);
2150     e = indexed(A, i, k) * indexed(B, k, j) - 2 * indexed(C, i, j);
2151     cout << e << endl;
2152      // -> -2*[[8,4],[2,1]].i.j+[[-1,0],[2,1]].k.j*[[1,2],[3,4]].i.k
2153     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2154      // -> [[-13,-6],[1,2]].i.j
2155 @}
2156 @end example
2157
2158 Using indices is most useful when working with rectangular matrices and
2159 one-dimensional vectors because you don't have to worry about having to
2160 transpose matrices before multiplying them. @xref{Indexed objects}, for
2161 more information about using matrices with indices, and about indices in
2162 general.
2163
2164 The @code{matrix} class provides a couple of additional methods for
2165 computing determinants, traces, characteristic polynomials and ranks:
2166
2167 @cindex @code{determinant()}
2168 @cindex @code{trace()}
2169 @cindex @code{charpoly()}
2170 @cindex @code{rank()}
2171 @example
2172 ex matrix::determinant(unsigned algo=determinant_algo::automatic) const;
2173 ex matrix::trace() const;
2174 ex matrix::charpoly(const ex & lambda) const;
2175 unsigned matrix::rank() const;
2176 @end example
2177
2178 The @samp{algo} argument of @code{determinant()} allows to select
2179 between different algorithms for calculating the determinant.  The
2180 asymptotic speed (as parametrized by the matrix size) can greatly differ
2181 between those algorithms, depending on the nature of the matrix'
2182 entries.  The possible values are defined in the @file{flags.h} header
2183 file.  By default, GiNaC uses a heuristic to automatically select an
2184 algorithm that is likely (but not guaranteed) to give the result most
2185 quickly.
2186
2187 @cindex @code{inverse()} (matrix)
2188 @cindex @code{solve()}
2189 Matrices may also be inverted using the @code{ex matrix::inverse()}
2190 method and linear systems may be solved with:
2191
2192 @example
2193 matrix matrix::solve(const matrix & vars, const matrix & rhs,
2194                      unsigned algo=solve_algo::automatic) const;
2195 @end example
2196
2197 Assuming the matrix object this method is applied on is an @code{m}
2198 times @code{n} matrix, then @code{vars} must be a @code{n} times
2199 @code{p} matrix of symbolic indeterminates and @code{rhs} a @code{m}
2200 times @code{p} matrix.  The returned matrix then has dimension @code{n}
2201 times @code{p} and in the case of an underdetermined system will still
2202 contain some of the indeterminates from @code{vars}.  If the system is
2203 overdetermined, an exception is thrown.
2204
2205
2206 @node Indexed objects, Non-commutative objects, Matrices, Basic concepts
2207 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
2208 @section Indexed objects
2209
2210 GiNaC allows you to handle expressions containing general indexed objects in
2211 arbitrary spaces. It is also able to canonicalize and simplify such
2212 expressions and perform symbolic dummy index summations. There are a number
2213 of predefined indexed objects provided, like delta and metric tensors.
2214
2215 There are few restrictions placed on indexed objects and their indices and
2216 it is easy to construct nonsense expressions, but our intention is to
2217 provide a general framework that allows you to implement algorithms with
2218 indexed quantities, getting in the way as little as possible.
2219
2220 @cindex @code{idx} (class)
2221 @cindex @code{indexed} (class)
2222 @subsection Indexed quantities and their indices
2223
2224 Indexed expressions in GiNaC are constructed of two special types of objects,
2225 @dfn{index objects} and @dfn{indexed objects}.
2226
2227 @itemize @bullet
2228
2229 @cindex contravariant
2230 @cindex covariant
2231 @cindex variance
2232 @item Index objects are of class @code{idx} or a subclass. Every index has
2233 a @dfn{value} and a @dfn{dimension} (which is the dimension of the space
2234 the index lives in) which can both be arbitrary expressions but are usually
2235 a number or a simple symbol. In addition, indices of class @code{varidx} have
2236 a @dfn{variance} (they can be co- or contravariant), and indices of class
2237 @code{spinidx} have a variance and can be @dfn{dotted} or @dfn{undotted}.
2238
2239 @item Indexed objects are of class @code{indexed} or a subclass. They
2240 contain a @dfn{base expression} (which is the expression being indexed), and
2241 one or more indices.
2242
2243 @end itemize
2244
2245 @strong{Please notice:} when printing expressions, covariant indices and indices
2246 without variance are denoted @samp{.i} while contravariant indices are
2247 denoted @samp{~i}. Dotted indices have a @samp{*} in front of the index
2248 value. In the following, we are going to use that notation in the text so
2249 instead of @math{A^i_jk} we will write @samp{A~i.j.k}. Index dimensions are
2250 not visible in the output.
2251
2252 A simple example shall illustrate the concepts:
2253
2254 @example
2255 #include <iostream>
2256 #include <ginac/ginac.h>
2257 using namespace std;
2258 using namespace GiNaC;
2259
2260 int main()
2261 @{
2262     symbol i_sym("i"), j_sym("j");
2263     idx i(i_sym, 3), j(j_sym, 3);
2264
2265     symbol A("A");
2266     cout << indexed(A, i, j) << endl;
2267      // -> A.i.j
2268     cout << index_dimensions << indexed(A, i, j) << endl;
2269      // -> A.i[3].j[3]
2270     cout << dflt; // reset cout to default output format (dimensions hidden)
2271     ...
2272 @end example
2273
2274 The @code{idx} constructor takes two arguments, the index value and the
2275 index dimension. First we define two index objects, @code{i} and @code{j},
2276 both with the numeric dimension 3. The value of the index @code{i} is the
2277 symbol @code{i_sym} (which prints as @samp{i}) and the value of the index
2278 @code{j} is the symbol @code{j_sym} (which prints as @samp{j}). Next we
2279 construct an expression containing one indexed object, @samp{A.i.j}. It has
2280 the symbol @code{A} as its base expression and the two indices @code{i} and
2281 @code{j}.
2282
2283 The dimensions of indices are normally not visible in the output, but one
2284 can request them to be printed with the @code{index_dimensions} manipulator,
2285 as shown above.
2286
2287 Note the difference between the indices @code{i} and @code{j} which are of
2288 class @code{idx}, and the index values which are the symbols @code{i_sym}
2289 and @code{j_sym}. The indices of indexed objects cannot directly be symbols
2290 or numbers but must be index objects. For example, the following is not
2291 correct and will raise an exception:
2292
2293 @example
2294 symbol i("i"), j("j");
2295 e = indexed(A, i, j); // ERROR: indices must be of type idx
2296 @end example
2297
2298 You can have multiple indexed objects in an expression, index values can
2299 be numeric, and index dimensions symbolic:
2300
2301 @example
2302     ...
2303     symbol B("B"), dim("dim");
2304     cout << 4 * indexed(A, i)
2305           + indexed(B, idx(j_sym, 4), idx(2, 3), idx(i_sym, dim)) << endl;
2306      // -> B.j.2.i+4*A.i
2307     ...
2308 @end example
2309
2310 @code{B} has a 4-dimensional symbolic index @samp{k}, a 3-dimensional numeric
2311 index of value 2, and a symbolic index @samp{i} with the symbolic dimension
2312 @samp{dim}. Note that GiNaC doesn't automatically notify you that the free
2313 indices of @samp{A} and @samp{B} in the sum don't match (you have to call
2314 @code{simplify_indexed()} for that, see below).
2315
2316 In fact, base expressions, index values and index dimensions can be
2317 arbitrary expressions:
2318
2319 @example
2320     ...
2321     cout << indexed(A+B, idx(2*i_sym+1, dim/2)) << endl;
2322      // -> (B+A).(1+2*i)
2323     ...
2324 @end example
2325
2326 It's also possible to construct nonsense like @samp{Pi.sin(x)}. You will not
2327 get an error message from this but you will probably not be able to do
2328 anything useful with it.
2329
2330 @cindex @code{get_value()}
2331 @cindex @code{get_dim()}
2332 The methods
2333
2334 @example
2335 ex idx::get_value();
2336 ex idx::get_dim();
2337 @end example
2338
2339 return the value and dimension of an @code{idx} object. If you have an index
2340 in an expression, such as returned by calling @code{.op()} on an indexed
2341 object, you can get a reference to the @code{idx} object with the function
2342 @code{ex_to<idx>()} on the expression.
2343
2344 There are also the methods
2345
2346 @example
2347 bool idx::is_numeric();
2348 bool idx::is_symbolic();
2349 bool idx::is_dim_numeric();
2350 bool idx::is_dim_symbolic();
2351 @end example
2352
2353 for checking whether the value and dimension are numeric or symbolic
2354 (non-numeric). Using the @code{info()} method of an index (see @ref{Information
2355 about expressions}) returns information about the index value.
2356
2357 @cindex @code{varidx} (class)
2358 If you need co- and contravariant indices, use the @code{varidx} class:
2359
2360 @example
2361     ...
2362     symbol mu_sym("mu"), nu_sym("nu");
2363     varidx mu(mu_sym, 4), nu(nu_sym, 4); // default is contravariant ~mu, ~nu
2364     varidx mu_co(mu_sym, 4, true);       // covariant index .mu
2365
2366     cout << indexed(A, mu, nu) << endl;
2367      // -> A~mu~nu
2368     cout << indexed(A, mu_co, nu) << endl;
2369      // -> A.mu~nu
2370     cout << indexed(A, mu.toggle_variance(), nu) << endl;
2371      // -> A.mu~nu
2372     ...
2373 @end example
2374
2375 A @code{varidx} is an @code{idx} with an additional flag that marks it as
2376 co- or contravariant. The default is a contravariant (upper) index, but
2377 this can be overridden by supplying a third argument to the @code{varidx}
2378 constructor. The two methods
2379
2380 @example
2381 bool varidx::is_covariant();
2382 bool varidx::is_contravariant();
2383 @end example
2384
2385 allow you to check the variance of a @code{varidx} object (use @code{ex_to<varidx>()}
2386 to get the object reference from an expression). There's also the very useful
2387 method
2388
2389 @example
2390 ex varidx::toggle_variance();
2391 @end example
2392
2393 which makes a new index with the same value and dimension but the opposite
2394 variance. By using it you only have to define the index once.
2395
2396 @cindex @code{spinidx} (class)
2397 The @code{spinidx} class provides dotted and undotted variant indices, as
2398 used in the Weyl-van-der-Waerden spinor formalism:
2399
2400 @example
2401     ...
2402     symbol K("K"), C_sym("C"), D_sym("D");
2403     spinidx C(C_sym, 2), D(D_sym);          // default is 2-dimensional,
2404                                             // contravariant, undotted
2405     spinidx C_co(C_sym, 2, true);           // covariant index
2406     spinidx D_dot(D_sym, 2, false, true);   // contravariant, dotted
2407     spinidx D_co_dot(D_sym, 2, true, true); // covariant, dotted
2408
2409     cout << indexed(K, C, D) << endl;
2410      // -> K~C~D
2411     cout << indexed(K, C_co, D_dot) << endl;
2412      // -> K.C~*D
2413     cout << indexed(K, D_co_dot, D) << endl;
2414      // -> K.*D~D
2415     ...
2416 @end example
2417
2418 A @code{spinidx} is a @code{varidx} with an additional flag that marks it as
2419 dotted or undotted. The default is undotted but this can be overridden by
2420 supplying a fourth argument to the @code{spinidx} constructor. The two
2421 methods
2422
2423 @example
2424 bool spinidx::is_dotted();
2425 bool spinidx::is_undotted();
2426 @end example
2427
2428 allow you to check whether or not a @code{spinidx} object is dotted (use
2429 @code{ex_to<spinidx>()} to get the object reference from an expression).
2430 Finally, the two methods
2431
2432 @example
2433 ex spinidx::toggle_dot();
2434 ex spinidx::toggle_variance_dot();
2435 @end example
2436
2437 create a new index with the same value and dimension but opposite dottedness
2438 and the same or opposite variance.
2439
2440 @subsection Substituting indices
2441
2442 @cindex @code{subs()}
2443 Sometimes you will want to substitute one symbolic index with another
2444 symbolic or numeric index, for example when calculating one specific element
2445 of a tensor expression. This is done with the @code{.subs()} method, as it
2446 is done for symbols (see @ref{Substituting expressions}).
2447
2448 You have two possibilities here. You can either substitute the whole index
2449 by another index or expression:
2450
2451 @example
2452     ...
2453     ex e = indexed(A, mu_co);
2454     cout << e << " becomes " << e.subs(mu_co == nu) << endl;
2455      // -> A.mu becomes A~nu
2456     cout << e << " becomes " << e.subs(mu_co == varidx(0, 4)) << endl;
2457      // -> A.mu becomes A~0
2458     cout << e << " becomes " << e.subs(mu_co == 0) << endl;
2459      // -> A.mu becomes A.0
2460     ...
2461 @end example
2462
2463 The third example shows that trying to replace an index with something that
2464 is not an index will substitute the index value instead.
2465
2466 Alternatively, you can substitute the @emph{symbol} of a symbolic index by
2467 another expression:
2468
2469 @example
2470     ...
2471     ex e = indexed(A, mu_co);
2472     cout << e << " becomes " << e.subs(mu_sym == nu_sym) << endl;
2473      // -> A.mu becomes A.nu
2474     cout << e << " becomes " << e.subs(mu_sym == 0) << endl;
2475      // -> A.mu becomes A.0
2476     ...
2477 @end example
2478
2479 As you see, with the second method only the value of the index will get
2480 substituted. Its other properties, including its dimension, remain unchanged.
2481 If you want to change the dimension of an index you have to substitute the
2482 whole index by another one with the new dimension.
2483
2484 Finally, substituting the base expression of an indexed object works as
2485 expected:
2486
2487 @example
2488     ...
2489     ex e = indexed(A, mu_co);
2490     cout << e << " becomes " << e.subs(A == A+B) << endl;
2491      // -> A.mu becomes (B+A).mu
2492     ...
2493 @end example
2494
2495 @subsection Symmetries
2496 @cindex @code{symmetry} (class)
2497 @cindex @code{sy_none()}
2498 @cindex @code{sy_symm()}
2499 @cindex @code{sy_anti()}
2500 @cindex @code{sy_cycl()}
2501
2502 Indexed objects can have certain symmetry properties with respect to their
2503 indices. Symmetries are specified as a tree of objects of class @code{symmetry}
2504 that is constructed with the helper functions
2505
2506 @example
2507 symmetry sy_none(...);
2508 symmetry sy_symm(...);
2509 symmetry sy_anti(...);
2510 symmetry sy_cycl(...);
2511 @end example
2512
2513 @code{sy_none()} stands for no symmetry, @code{sy_symm()} and @code{sy_anti()}
2514 specify fully symmetric or antisymmetric, respectively, and @code{sy_cycl()}
2515 represents a cyclic symmetry. Each of these functions accepts up to four
2516 arguments which can be either symmetry objects themselves or unsigned integer
2517 numbers that represent an index position (counting from 0). A symmetry
2518 specification that consists of only a single @code{sy_symm()}, @code{sy_anti()}
2519 or @code{sy_cycl()} with no arguments specifies the respective symmetry for
2520 all indices.
2521
2522 Here are some examples of symmetry definitions:
2523
2524 @example
2525     ...
2526     // No symmetry:
2527     e = indexed(A, i, j);
2528     e = indexed(A, sy_none(), i, j);     // equivalent
2529     e = indexed(A, sy_none(0, 1), i, j); // equivalent
2530
2531     // Symmetric in all three indices:
2532     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(), i, j, k);
2533     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(0, 1, 2), i, j, k); // equivalent
2534     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(2, 0, 1), i, j, k); // same symmetry, but yields a
2535                                                // different canonical order
2536
2537     // Symmetric in the first two indices only:
2538     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(0, 1), i, j, k);
2539     e = indexed(A, sy_none(sy_symm(0, 1), 2), i, j, k); // equivalent
2540
2541     // Antisymmetric in the first and last index only (index ranges need not
2542     // be contiguous):
2543     e = indexed(A, sy_anti(0, 2), i, j, k);
2544     e = indexed(A, sy_none(sy_anti(0, 2), 1), i, j, k); // equivalent
2545
2546     // An example of a mixed symmetry: antisymmetric in the first two and
2547     // last two indices, symmetric when swapping the first and last index
2548     // pairs (like the Riemann curvature tensor):
2549     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(sy_anti(0, 1), sy_anti(2, 3)), i, j, k, l);
2550
2551     // Cyclic symmetry in all three indices:
2552     e = indexed(A, sy_cycl(), i, j, k);
2553     e = indexed(A, sy_cycl(0, 1, 2), i, j, k); // equivalent
2554
2555     // The following examples are invalid constructions that will throw
2556     // an exception at run time.
2557
2558     // An index may not appear multiple times:
2559     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(0, 0, 1), i, j, k); // ERROR
2560     e = indexed(A, sy_none(sy_symm(0, 1), sy_anti(0, 2)), i, j, k); // ERROR
2561
2562     // Every child of sy_symm(), sy_anti() and sy_cycl() must refer to the
2563     // same number of indices:
2564     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(sy_anti(0, 1), 2), i, j, k); // ERROR
2565
2566     // And of course, you cannot specify indices which are not there:
2567     e = indexed(A, sy_symm(0, 1, 2, 3), i, j, k); // ERROR
2568     ...
2569 @end example
2570
2571 If you need to specify more than four indices, you have to use the
2572 @code{.add()} method of the @code{symmetry} class. For example, to specify
2573 full symmetry in the first six indices you would write
2574 @code{sy_symm(0, 1, 2, 3).add(4).add(5)}.
2575
2576 If an indexed object has a symmetry, GiNaC will automatically bring the
2577 indices into a canonical order which allows for some immediate simplifications:
2578
2579 @example
2580     ...
2581     cout << indexed(A, sy_symm(), i, j)
2582           + indexed(A, sy_symm(), j, i) << endl;
2583      // -> 2*A.j.i
2584     cout << indexed(B, sy_anti(), i, j)
2585           + indexed(B, sy_anti(), j, i) << endl;
2586      // -> 0
2587     cout << indexed(B, sy_anti(), i, j, k)
2588           - indexed(B, sy_anti(), j, k, i) << endl;
2589      // -> 0
2590     ...
2591 @end example
2592
2593 @cindex @code{get_free_indices()}
2594 @cindex dummy index
2595 @subsection Dummy indices
2596
2597 GiNaC treats certain symbolic index pairs as @dfn{dummy indices} meaning
2598 that a summation over the index range is implied. Symbolic indices which are
2599 not dummy indices are called @dfn{free indices}. Numeric indices are neither
2600 dummy nor free indices.
2601
2602 To be recognized as a dummy index pair, the two indices must be of the same
2603 class and their value must be the same single symbol (an index like
2604 @samp{2*n+1} is never a dummy index). If the indices are of class
2605 @code{varidx} they must also be of opposite variance; if they are of class
2606 @code{spinidx} they must be both dotted or both undotted.
2607
2608 The method @code{.get_free_indices()} returns a vector containing the free
2609 indices of an expression. It also checks that the free indices of the terms
2610 of a sum are consistent:
2611
2612 @example
2613 @{
2614     symbol A("A"), B("B"), C("C");
2615
2616     symbol i_sym("i"), j_sym("j"), k_sym("k"), l_sym("l");
2617     idx i(i_sym, 3), j(j_sym, 3), k(k_sym, 3), l(l_sym, 3);
2618
2619     ex e = indexed(A, i, j) * indexed(B, j, k) + indexed(C, k, l, i, l);
2620     cout << exprseq(e.get_free_indices()) << endl;
2621      // -> (.i,.k)
2622      // 'j' and 'l' are dummy indices
2623
2624     symbol mu_sym("mu"), nu_sym("nu"), rho_sym("rho"), sigma_sym("sigma");
2625     varidx mu(mu_sym, 4), nu(nu_sym, 4), rho(rho_sym, 4), sigma(sigma_sym, 4);
2626
2627     e = indexed(A, mu, nu) * indexed(B, nu.toggle_variance(), rho)
2628       + indexed(C, mu, sigma, rho, sigma.toggle_variance());
2629     cout << exprseq(e.get_free_indices()) << endl;
2630      // -> (~mu,~rho)
2631      // 'nu' is a dummy index, but 'sigma' is not
2632
2633     e = indexed(A, mu, mu);
2634     cout << exprseq(e.get_free_indices()) << endl;
2635      // -> (~mu)
2636      // 'mu' is not a dummy index because it appears twice with the same
2637      // variance
2638
2639     e = indexed(A, mu, nu) + 42;
2640     cout << exprseq(e.get_free_indices()) << endl; // ERROR
2641      // this will throw an exception:
2642      // "add::get_free_indices: inconsistent indices in sum"
2643 @}
2644 @end example
2645
2646 @cindex @code{expand_dummy_sum()}
2647 A dummy index summation like 
2648 @tex
2649 $ a_i b^i$
2650 @end tex
2651 @ifnottex
2652 a.i b~i
2653 @end ifnottex
2654 can be expanded for indices with numeric
2655 dimensions (e.g. 3)  into the explicit sum like
2656 @tex
2657 $a_1b^1+a_2b^2+a_3b^3 $.
2658 @end tex
2659 @ifnottex
2660 a.1 b~1 + a.2 b~2 + a.3 b~3.
2661 @end ifnottex
2662 This is performed by the function
2663
2664 @example
2665     ex expand_dummy_sum(const ex & e, bool subs_idx = false);
2666 @end example
2667
2668 which takes an expression @code{e} and returns the expanded sum for all
2669 dummy indices with numeric dimensions. If the parameter @code{subs_idx}
2670 is set to @code{true} then all substitutions are made by @code{idx} class
2671 indices, i.e. without variance. In this case the above sum 
2672 @tex
2673 $ a_i b^i$
2674 @end tex
2675 @ifnottex
2676 a.i b~i
2677 @end ifnottex
2678 will be expanded to
2679 @tex
2680 $a_1b_1+a_2b_2+a_3b_3 $.
2681 @end tex
2682 @ifnottex
2683 a.1 b.1 + a.2 b.2 + a.3 b.3.
2684 @end ifnottex
2685
2686
2687 @cindex @code{simplify_indexed()}
2688 @subsection Simplifying indexed expressions
2689
2690 In addition to the few automatic simplifications that GiNaC performs on
2691 indexed expressions (such as re-ordering the indices of symmetric tensors
2692 and calculating traces and convolutions of matrices and predefined tensors)
2693 there is the method
2694
2695 @example
2696 ex ex::simplify_indexed();
2697 ex ex::simplify_indexed(const scalar_products & sp);
2698 @end example
2699
2700 that performs some more expensive operations:
2701
2702 @itemize @bullet
2703 @item it checks the consistency of free indices in sums in the same way
2704   @code{get_free_indices()} does
2705 @item it tries to give dummy indices that appear in different terms of a sum
2706   the same name to allow simplifications like @math{a_i*b_i-a_j*b_j=0}
2707 @item it (symbolically) calculates all possible dummy index summations/contractions
2708   with the predefined tensors (this will be explained in more detail in the
2709   next section)
2710 @item it detects contractions that vanish for symmetry reasons, for example
2711   the contraction of a symmetric and a totally antisymmetric tensor
2712 @item as a special case of dummy index summation, it can replace scalar products
2713   of two tensors with a user-defined value
2714 @end itemize
2715
2716 The last point is done with the help of the @code{scalar_products} class
2717 which is used to store scalar products with known values (this is not an
2718 arithmetic class, you just pass it to @code{simplify_indexed()}):
2719
2720 @example
2721 @{
2722     symbol A("A"), B("B"), C("C"), i_sym("i");
2723     idx i(i_sym, 3);
2724
2725     scalar_products sp;
2726     sp.add(A, B, 0); // A and B are orthogonal
2727     sp.add(A, C, 0); // A and C are orthogonal
2728     sp.add(A, A, 4); // A^2 = 4 (A has length 2)
2729
2730     e = indexed(A + B, i) * indexed(A + C, i);
2731     cout << e << endl;
2732      // -> (B+A).i*(A+C).i
2733
2734     cout << e.expand(expand_options::expand_indexed).simplify_indexed(sp)
2735          << endl;
2736      // -> 4+C.i*B.i
2737 @}
2738 @end example
2739
2740 The @code{scalar_products} object @code{sp} acts as a storage for the
2741 scalar products added to it with the @code{.add()} method. This method
2742 takes three arguments: the two expressions of which the scalar product is
2743 taken, and the expression to replace it with.
2744
2745 @cindex @code{expand()}
2746 The example above also illustrates a feature of the @code{expand()} method:
2747 if passed the @code{expand_indexed} option it will distribute indices
2748 over sums, so @samp{(A+B).i} becomes @samp{A.i+B.i}.
2749
2750 @cindex @code{tensor} (class)
2751 @subsection Predefined tensors
2752
2753 Some frequently used special tensors such as the delta, epsilon and metric
2754 tensors are predefined in GiNaC. They have special properties when
2755 contracted with other tensor expressions and some of them have constant
2756 matrix representations (they will evaluate to a number when numeric
2757 indices are specified).
2758
2759 @cindex @code{delta_tensor()}
2760 @subsubsection Delta tensor
2761
2762 The delta tensor takes two indices, is symmetric and has the matrix
2763 representation @code{diag(1, 1, 1, ...)}. It is constructed by the function
2764 @code{delta_tensor()}:
2765
2766 @example
2767 @{
2768     symbol A("A"), B("B");
2769
2770     idx i(symbol("i"), 3), j(symbol("j"), 3),
2771         k(symbol("k"), 3), l(symbol("l"), 3);
2772
2773     ex e = indexed(A, i, j) * indexed(B, k, l)
2774          * delta_tensor(i, k) * delta_tensor(j, l);
2775     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2776      // -> B.i.j*A.i.j
2777
2778     cout << delta_tensor(i, i) << endl;
2779      // -> 3
2780 @}
2781 @end example
2782
2783 @cindex @code{metric_tensor()}
2784 @subsubsection General metric tensor
2785
2786 The function @code{metric_tensor()} creates a general symmetric metric
2787 tensor with two indices that can be used to raise/lower tensor indices. The
2788 metric tensor is denoted as @samp{g} in the output and if its indices are of
2789 mixed variance it is automatically replaced by a delta tensor:
2790
2791 @example
2792 @{
2793     symbol A("A");
2794
2795     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), 4), nu(symbol("nu"), 4), rho(symbol("rho"), 4);
2796
2797     ex e = metric_tensor(mu, nu) * indexed(A, nu.toggle_variance(), rho);
2798     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2799      // -> A~mu~rho
2800
2801     e = delta_tensor(mu, nu.toggle_variance()) * metric_tensor(nu, rho);
2802     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2803      // -> g~mu~rho
2804
2805     e = metric_tensor(mu.toggle_variance(), nu.toggle_variance())
2806       * metric_tensor(nu, rho);
2807     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2808      // -> delta.mu~rho
2809
2810     e = metric_tensor(nu.toggle_variance(), rho.toggle_variance())
2811       * metric_tensor(mu, nu) * (delta_tensor(mu.toggle_variance(), rho)
2812         + indexed(A, mu.toggle_variance(), rho));
2813     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2814      // -> 4+A.rho~rho
2815 @}
2816 @end example
2817
2818 @cindex @code{lorentz_g()}
2819 @subsubsection Minkowski metric tensor
2820
2821 The Minkowski metric tensor is a special metric tensor with a constant
2822 matrix representation which is either @code{diag(1, -1, -1, ...)} (negative
2823 signature, the default) or @code{diag(-1, 1, 1, ...)} (positive signature).
2824 It is created with the function @code{lorentz_g()} (although it is output as
2825 @samp{eta}):
2826
2827 @example
2828 @{
2829     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), 4);
2830
2831     e = delta_tensor(varidx(0, 4), mu.toggle_variance())
2832       * lorentz_g(mu, varidx(0, 4));       // negative signature
2833     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2834      // -> 1
2835
2836     e = delta_tensor(varidx(0, 4), mu.toggle_variance())
2837       * lorentz_g(mu, varidx(0, 4), true); // positive signature
2838     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2839      // -> -1
2840 @}
2841 @end example
2842
2843 @cindex @code{spinor_metric()}
2844 @subsubsection Spinor metric tensor
2845
2846 The function @code{spinor_metric()} creates an antisymmetric tensor with
2847 two indices that is used to raise/lower indices of 2-component spinors.
2848 It is output as @samp{eps}:
2849
2850 @example
2851 @{
2852     symbol psi("psi");
2853
2854     spinidx A(symbol("A")), B(symbol("B")), C(symbol("C"));
2855     ex A_co = A.toggle_variance(), B_co = B.toggle_variance();
2856
2857     e = spinor_metric(A, B) * indexed(psi, B_co);
2858     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2859      // -> psi~A
2860
2861     e = spinor_metric(A, B) * indexed(psi, A_co);
2862     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2863      // -> -psi~B
2864
2865     e = spinor_metric(A_co, B_co) * indexed(psi, B);
2866     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2867      // -> -psi.A
2868
2869     e = spinor_metric(A_co, B_co) * indexed(psi, A);
2870     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2871      // -> psi.B
2872
2873     e = spinor_metric(A_co, B_co) * spinor_metric(A, B);
2874     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2875      // -> 2
2876
2877     e = spinor_metric(A_co, B_co) * spinor_metric(B, C);
2878     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2879      // -> -delta.A~C
2880 @}
2881 @end example
2882
2883 The matrix representation of the spinor metric is @code{[[0, 1], [-1, 0]]}.
2884
2885 @cindex @code{epsilon_tensor()}
2886 @cindex @code{lorentz_eps()}
2887 @subsubsection Epsilon tensor
2888
2889 The epsilon tensor is totally antisymmetric, its number of indices is equal
2890 to the dimension of the index space (the indices must all be of the same
2891 numeric dimension), and @samp{eps.1.2.3...} (resp. @samp{eps~0~1~2...}) is
2892 defined to be 1. Its behavior with indices that have a variance also
2893 depends on the signature of the metric. Epsilon tensors are output as
2894 @samp{eps}.
2895
2896 There are three functions defined to create epsilon tensors in 2, 3 and 4
2897 dimensions:
2898
2899 @example
2900 ex epsilon_tensor(const ex & i1, const ex & i2);
2901 ex epsilon_tensor(const ex & i1, const ex & i2, const ex & i3);
2902 ex lorentz_eps(const ex & i1, const ex & i2, const ex & i3, const ex & i4,
2903                bool pos_sig = false);
2904 @end example
2905
2906 The first two functions create an epsilon tensor in 2 or 3 Euclidean
2907 dimensions, the last function creates an epsilon tensor in a 4-dimensional
2908 Minkowski space (the last @code{bool} argument specifies whether the metric
2909 has negative or positive signature, as in the case of the Minkowski metric
2910 tensor):
2911
2912 @example
2913 @{
2914     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), 4), nu(symbol("nu"), 4), rho(symbol("rho"), 4),
2915            sig(symbol("sig"), 4), lam(symbol("lam"), 4), bet(symbol("bet"), 4);
2916     e = lorentz_eps(mu, nu, rho, sig) *
2917         lorentz_eps(mu.toggle_variance(), nu.toggle_variance(), lam, bet);
2918     cout << simplify_indexed(e) << endl;
2919      // -> 2*eta~bet~rho*eta~sig~lam-2*eta~sig~bet*eta~rho~lam
2920
2921     idx i(symbol("i"), 3), j(symbol("j"), 3), k(symbol("k"), 3);
2922     symbol A("A"), B("B");
2923     e = epsilon_tensor(i, j, k) * indexed(A, j) * indexed(B, k);
2924     cout << simplify_indexed(e) << endl;
2925      // -> -B.k*A.j*eps.i.k.j
2926     e = epsilon_tensor(i, j, k) * indexed(A, j) * indexed(A, k);
2927     cout << simplify_indexed(e) << endl;
2928      // -> 0
2929 @}
2930 @end example
2931
2932 @subsection Linear algebra
2933
2934 The @code{matrix} class can be used with indices to do some simple linear
2935 algebra (linear combinations and products of vectors and matrices, traces
2936 and scalar products):
2937
2938 @example
2939 @{
2940     idx i(symbol("i"), 2), j(symbol("j"), 2);
2941     symbol x("x"), y("y");
2942
2943     // A is a 2x2 matrix, X is a 2x1 vector
2944     matrix A = @{@{1, 2@},
2945                 @{3, 4@}@};
2946     matrix X = @{@{x, y@}@};
2947
2948     cout << indexed(A, i, i) << endl;
2949      // -> 5
2950
2951     ex e = indexed(A, i, j) * indexed(X, j);
2952     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2953      // -> [[2*y+x],[4*y+3*x]].i
2954
2955     e = indexed(A, i, j) * indexed(X, i) + indexed(X, j) * 2;
2956     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
2957      // -> [[3*y+3*x,6*y+2*x]].j
2958 @}
2959 @end example
2960
2961 You can of course obtain the same results with the @code{matrix::add()},
2962 @code{matrix::mul()} and @code{matrix::trace()} methods (@pxref{Matrices})
2963 but with indices you don't have to worry about transposing matrices.
2964
2965 Matrix indices always start at 0 and their dimension must match the number
2966 of rows/columns of the matrix. Matrices with one row or one column are
2967 vectors and can have one or two indices (it doesn't matter whether it's a
2968 row or a column vector). Other matrices must have two indices.
2969
2970 You should be careful when using indices with variance on matrices. GiNaC
2971 doesn't look at the variance and doesn't know that @samp{F~mu~nu} and
2972 @samp{F.mu.nu} are different matrices. In this case you should use only
2973 one form for @samp{F} and explicitly multiply it with a matrix representation
2974 of the metric tensor.
2975
2976
2977 @node Non-commutative objects, Hash maps, Indexed objects, Basic concepts
2978 @c    node-name, next, previous, up
2979 @section Non-commutative objects
2980
2981 GiNaC is equipped to handle certain non-commutative algebras. Three classes of
2982 non-commutative objects are built-in which are mostly of use in high energy
2983 physics:
2984
2985 @itemize
2986 @item Clifford (Dirac) algebra (class @code{clifford})
2987 @item su(3) Lie algebra (class @code{color})
2988 @item Matrices (unindexed) (class @code{matrix})
2989 @end itemize
2990
2991 The @code{clifford} and @code{color} classes are subclasses of
2992 @code{indexed} because the elements of these algebras usually carry
2993 indices. The @code{matrix} class is described in more detail in
2994 @ref{Matrices}.
2995
2996 Unlike most computer algebra systems, GiNaC does not primarily provide an
2997 operator (often denoted @samp{&*}) for representing inert products of
2998 arbitrary objects. Rather, non-commutativity in GiNaC is a property of the
2999 classes of objects involved, and non-commutative products are formed with
3000 the usual @samp{*} operator, as are ordinary products. GiNaC is capable of
3001 figuring out by itself which objects commutate and will group the factors
3002 by their class. Consider this example:
3003
3004 @example
3005     ...
3006     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), 4), nu(symbol("nu"), 4);
3007     idx a(symbol("a"), 8), b(symbol("b"), 8);
3008     ex e = -dirac_gamma(mu) * (2*color_T(a)) * 8 * color_T(b) * dirac_gamma(nu);
3009     cout << e << endl;
3010      // -> -16*(gamma~mu*gamma~nu)*(T.a*T.b)
3011     ...
3012 @end example
3013
3014 As can be seen, GiNaC pulls out the overall commutative factor @samp{-16} and
3015 groups the non-commutative factors (the gammas and the su(3) generators)
3016 together while preserving the order of factors within each class (because
3017 Clifford objects commutate with color objects). The resulting expression is a
3018 @emph{commutative} product with two factors that are themselves non-commutative
3019 products (@samp{gamma~mu*gamma~nu} and @samp{T.a*T.b}). For clarification,
3020 parentheses are placed around the non-commutative products in the output.
3021
3022 @cindex @code{ncmul} (class)
3023 Non-commutative products are internally represented by objects of the class
3024 @code{ncmul}, as opposed to commutative products which are handled by the
3025 @code{mul} class. You will normally not have to worry about this distinction,
3026 though.
3027
3028 The advantage of this approach is that you never have to worry about using
3029 (or forgetting to use) a special operator when constructing non-commutative
3030 expressions. Also, non-commutative products in GiNaC are more intelligent
3031 than in other computer algebra systems; they can, for example, automatically
3032 canonicalize themselves according to rules specified in the implementation
3033 of the non-commutative classes. The drawback is that to work with other than
3034 the built-in algebras you have to implement new classes yourself. Both
3035 symbols and user-defined functions can be specified as being non-commutative.
3036 For symbols, this is done by subclassing class symbol; for functions,
3037 by explicitly setting the return type (@pxref{Symbolic functions}).
3038
3039 @cindex @code{return_type()}
3040 @cindex @code{return_type_tinfo()}
3041 Information about the commutativity of an object or expression can be
3042 obtained with the two member functions
3043
3044 @example
3045 unsigned      ex::return_type() const;
3046 return_type_t ex::return_type_tinfo() const;
3047 @end example
3048
3049 The @code{return_type()} function returns one of three values (defined in
3050 the header file @file{flags.h}), corresponding to three categories of
3051 expressions in GiNaC:
3052
3053 @itemize @bullet
3054 @item @code{return_types::commutative}: Commutates with everything. Most GiNaC
3055   classes are of this kind.
3056 @item @code{return_types::noncommutative}: Non-commutative, belonging to a
3057   certain class of non-commutative objects which can be determined with the
3058   @code{return_type_tinfo()} method. Expressions of this category commutate
3059   with everything except @code{noncommutative} expressions of the same
3060   class.
3061 @item @code{return_types::noncommutative_composite}: Non-commutative, composed
3062   of non-commutative objects of different classes. Expressions of this
3063   category don't commutate with any other @code{noncommutative} or
3064   @code{noncommutative_composite} expressions.
3065 @end itemize
3066
3067 The @code{return_type_tinfo()} method returns an object of type
3068 @code{return_type_t} that contains information about the type of the expression
3069 and, if given, its representation label (see section on dirac gamma matrices for
3070 more details).  The objects of type @code{return_type_t} can be tested for
3071 equality to test whether two expressions belong to the same category and
3072 therefore may not commute.
3073
3074 Here are a couple of examples:
3075
3076 @cartouche
3077 @multitable @columnfractions .6 .4
3078 @item @strong{Expression} @tab @strong{@code{return_type()}}
3079 @item @code{42} @tab @code{commutative}
3080 @item @code{2*x-y} @tab @code{commutative}
3081 @item @code{dirac_ONE()} @tab @code{noncommutative}
3082 @item @code{dirac_gamma(mu)*dirac_gamma(nu)} @tab @code{noncommutative}
3083 @item @code{2*color_T(a)} @tab @code{noncommutative}
3084 @item @code{dirac_ONE()*color_T(a)} @tab @code{noncommutative_composite}
3085 @end multitable
3086 @end cartouche
3087
3088 A last note: With the exception of matrices, positive integer powers of
3089 non-commutative objects are automatically expanded in GiNaC. For example,
3090 @code{pow(a*b, 2)} becomes @samp{a*b*a*b} if @samp{a} and @samp{b} are
3091 non-commutative expressions).
3092
3093
3094 @cindex @code{clifford} (class)
3095 @subsection Clifford algebra
3096
3097
3098 Clifford algebras are supported in two flavours: Dirac gamma
3099 matrices (more physical) and generic Clifford algebras (more
3100 mathematical). 
3101
3102 @cindex @code{dirac_gamma()}
3103 @subsubsection Dirac gamma matrices
3104 Dirac gamma matrices (note that GiNaC doesn't treat them
3105 as matrices) are designated as @samp{gamma~mu} and satisfy
3106 @samp{gamma~mu*gamma~nu + gamma~nu*gamma~mu = 2*eta~mu~nu} where
3107 @samp{eta~mu~nu} is the Minkowski metric tensor. Dirac gammas are
3108 constructed by the function
3109
3110 @example
3111 ex dirac_gamma(const ex & mu, unsigned char rl = 0);
3112 @end example
3113
3114 which takes two arguments: the index and a @dfn{representation label} in the
3115 range 0 to 255 which is used to distinguish elements of different Clifford
3116 algebras (this is also called a @dfn{spin line index}). Gammas with different
3117 labels commutate with each other. The dimension of the index can be 4 or (in
3118 the framework of dimensional regularization) any symbolic value. Spinor
3119 indices on Dirac gammas are not supported in GiNaC.
3120
3121 @cindex @code{dirac_ONE()}
3122 The unity element of a Clifford algebra is constructed by
3123
3124 @example
3125 ex dirac_ONE(unsigned char rl = 0);
3126 @end example
3127
3128 @strong{Please notice:} You must always use @code{dirac_ONE()} when referring to
3129 multiples of the unity element, even though it's customary to omit it.
3130 E.g. instead of @code{dirac_gamma(mu)*(dirac_slash(q,4)+m)} you have to
3131 write @code{dirac_gamma(mu)*(dirac_slash(q,4)+m*dirac_ONE())}. Otherwise,
3132 GiNaC will complain and/or produce incorrect results.
3133
3134 @cindex @code{dirac_gamma5()}
3135 There is a special element @samp{gamma5} that commutates with all other
3136 gammas, has a unit square, and in 4 dimensions equals
3137 @samp{gamma~0 gamma~1 gamma~2 gamma~3}, provided by
3138
3139 @example
3140 ex dirac_gamma5(unsigned char rl = 0);
3141 @end example
3142
3143 @cindex @code{dirac_gammaL()}
3144 @cindex @code{dirac_gammaR()}
3145 The chiral projectors @samp{(1+/-gamma5)/2} are also available as proper
3146 objects, constructed by
3147
3148 @example
3149 ex dirac_gammaL(unsigned char rl = 0);
3150 ex dirac_gammaR(unsigned char rl = 0);
3151 @end example
3152
3153 They observe the relations @samp{gammaL^2 = gammaL}, @samp{gammaR^2 = gammaR},
3154 and @samp{gammaL gammaR = gammaR gammaL = 0}.
3155
3156 @cindex @code{dirac_slash()}
3157 Finally, the function
3158
3159 @example
3160 ex dirac_slash(const ex & e, const ex & dim, unsigned char rl = 0);
3161 @end example
3162
3163 creates a term that represents a contraction of @samp{e} with the Dirac
3164 Lorentz vector (it behaves like a term of the form @samp{e.mu gamma~mu}
3165 with a unique index whose dimension is given by the @code{dim} argument).
3166 Such slashed expressions are printed with a trailing backslash, e.g. @samp{e\}.
3167
3168 In products of dirac gammas, superfluous unity elements are automatically
3169 removed, squares are replaced by their values, and @samp{gamma5}, @samp{gammaL}
3170 and @samp{gammaR} are moved to the front.
3171
3172 The @code{simplify_indexed()} function performs contractions in gamma strings,
3173 for example
3174
3175 @example
3176 @{
3177     ...
3178     symbol a("a"), b("b"), D("D");
3179     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), D);
3180     ex e = dirac_gamma(mu) * dirac_slash(a, D)
3181          * dirac_gamma(mu.toggle_variance());
3182     cout << e << endl;
3183      // -> gamma~mu*a\*gamma.mu
3184     e = e.simplify_indexed();
3185     cout << e << endl;
3186      // -> -D*a\+2*a\
3187     cout << e.subs(D == 4) << endl;
3188      // -> -2*a\
3189     ...
3190 @}
3191 @end example
3192
3193 @cindex @code{dirac_trace()}
3194 To calculate the trace of an expression containing strings of Dirac gammas
3195 you use one of the functions
3196
3197 @example
3198 ex dirac_trace(const ex & e, const std::set<unsigned char> & rls,
3199                const ex & trONE = 4);
3200 ex dirac_trace(const ex & e, const lst & rll, const ex & trONE = 4);
3201 ex dirac_trace(const ex & e, unsigned char rl = 0, const ex & trONE = 4);
3202 @end example
3203
3204 These functions take the trace over all gammas in the specified set @code{rls}
3205 or list @code{rll} of representation labels, or the single label @code{rl};
3206 gammas with other labels are left standing. The last argument to
3207 @code{dirac_trace()} is the value to be returned for the trace of the unity
3208 element, which defaults to 4.
3209
3210 The @code{dirac_trace()} function is a linear functional that is equal to the
3211 ordinary matrix trace only in @math{D = 4} dimensions. In particular, the
3212 functional is not cyclic in
3213 @tex $D \ne 4$
3214 @end tex
3215 @ifnottex
3216 @math{D != 4}
3217 @end ifnottex
3218 dimensions when acting on
3219 expressions containing @samp{gamma5}, so it's not a proper trace. This
3220 @samp{gamma5} scheme is described in greater detail in the article
3221 @cite{The Role of gamma5 in Dimensional Regularization} (@ref{Bibliography}).
3222
3223 The value of the trace itself is also usually different in 4 and in
3224 @tex $D \ne 4$
3225 @end tex
3226 @ifnottex
3227 @math{D != 4}
3228 @end ifnottex
3229 dimensions:
3230
3231 @example
3232 @{
3233     // 4 dimensions
3234     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), 4), nu(symbol("nu"), 4), rho(symbol("rho"), 4);
3235     ex e = dirac_gamma(mu) * dirac_gamma(nu) *
3236            dirac_gamma(mu.toggle_variance()) * dirac_gamma(rho);
3237     cout << dirac_trace(e).simplify_indexed() << endl;
3238      // -> -8*eta~rho~nu
3239 @}
3240 ...
3241 @{
3242     // D dimensions
3243     symbol D("D");
3244     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), D), nu(symbol("nu"), D), rho(symbol("rho"), D);
3245     ex e = dirac_gamma(mu) * dirac_gamma(nu) *
3246            dirac_gamma(mu.toggle_variance()) * dirac_gamma(rho);
3247     cout << dirac_trace(e).simplify_indexed() << endl;
3248      // -> 8*eta~rho~nu-4*eta~rho~nu*D
3249 @}
3250 @end example
3251
3252 Here is an example for using @code{dirac_trace()} to compute a value that
3253 appears in the calculation of the one-loop vacuum polarization amplitude in
3254 QED:
3255
3256 @example
3257 @{
3258     symbol q("q"), l("l"), m("m"), ldotq("ldotq"), D("D");
3259     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), D), nu(symbol("nu"), D);
3260
3261     scalar_products sp;
3262     sp.add(l, l, pow(l, 2));
3263     sp.add(l, q, ldotq);
3264
3265     ex e = dirac_gamma(mu) *
3266            (dirac_slash(l, D) + dirac_slash(q, D) + m * dirac_ONE()) *    
3267            dirac_gamma(mu.toggle_variance()) *
3268            (dirac_slash(l, D) + m * dirac_ONE());   
3269     e = dirac_trace(e).simplify_indexed(sp);
3270     e = e.collect(lst@{l, ldotq, m@});
3271     cout << e << endl;
3272      // -> (8-4*D)*l^2+(8-4*D)*ldotq+4*D*m^2
3273 @}
3274 @end example
3275
3276 The @code{canonicalize_clifford()} function reorders all gamma products that
3277 appear in an expression to a canonical (but not necessarily simple) form.
3278 You can use this to compare two expressions or for further simplifications:
3279
3280 @example
3281 @{
3282     varidx mu(symbol("mu"), 4), nu(symbol("nu"), 4);
3283     ex e = dirac_gamma(mu) * dirac_gamma(nu) + dirac_gamma(nu) * dirac_gamma(mu);
3284     cout << e << endl;
3285      // -> gamma~mu*gamma~nu+gamma~nu*gamma~mu
3286
3287     e = canonicalize_clifford(e);
3288     cout << e << endl;
3289      // -> 2*ONE*eta~mu~nu
3290 @}
3291 @end example
3292
3293 @cindex @code{clifford_unit()}
3294 @subsubsection A generic Clifford algebra
3295
3296 A generic Clifford algebra, i.e. a
3297 @tex $2^n$
3298 @end tex
3299 @ifnottex
3300 2^n
3301 @end ifnottex
3302 dimensional algebra with
3303 generators 
3304 @tex $e_k$
3305 @end tex 
3306 @ifnottex
3307 e_k
3308 @end ifnottex
3309 satisfying the identities 
3310 @tex
3311 $e_i e_j + e_j e_i = M(i, j) + M(j, i)$
3312 @end tex
3313 @ifnottex
3314 e~i e~j + e~j e~i = M(i, j) + M(j, i) 
3315 @end ifnottex
3316 for some bilinear form (@code{metric})
3317 @math{M(i, j)}, which may be non-symmetric (see arXiv:math.QA/9911180) 
3318 and contain symbolic entries. Such generators are created by the
3319 function 
3320
3321 @example
3322     ex clifford_unit(const ex & mu, const ex & metr, unsigned char rl = 0);    
3323 @end example
3324
3325 where @code{mu} should be a @code{idx} (or descendant) class object
3326 indexing the generators.
3327 Parameter @code{metr} defines the metric @math{M(i, j)} and can be
3328 represented by a square @code{matrix}, @code{tensormetric} or @code{indexed} class
3329 object. In fact, any expression either with two free indices or without
3330 indices at all is admitted as @code{metr}. In the later case an @code{indexed}
3331 object with two newly created indices with @code{metr} as its
3332 @code{op(0)} will be used.
3333 Optional parameter @code{rl} allows to distinguish different
3334 Clifford algebras, which will commute with each other. 
3335
3336 Note that the call @code{clifford_unit(mu, minkmetric())} creates
3337 something very close to @code{dirac_gamma(mu)}, although
3338 @code{dirac_gamma} have more efficient simplification mechanism. 
3339 @cindex @code{get_metric()}
3340 Also, the object created by @code{clifford_unit(mu, minkmetric())} is
3341 not aware about the symmetry of its metric, see the start of the pevious
3342 paragraph. A more accurate analog of 'dirac_gamma(mu)' should be
3343 specifies as follows:
3344
3345 @example
3346     clifford_unit(mu, indexed(minkmetric(),sy_symm(),varidx(symbol("i"),4),varidx(symbol("j"),4)));
3347 @end example
3348
3349 The method @code{clifford::get_metric()} returns a metric defining this
3350 Clifford number.
3351
3352 If the matrix @math{M(i, j)} is in fact symmetric you may prefer to create
3353 the Clifford algebra units with a call like that
3354
3355 @example
3356     ex e = clifford_unit(mu, indexed(M, sy_symm(), i, j));
3357 @end example
3358
3359 since this may yield some further automatic simplifications. Again, for a
3360 metric defined through a @code{matrix} such a symmetry is detected
3361 automatically. 
3362
3363 Individual generators of a Clifford algebra can be accessed in several
3364 ways. For example 
3365
3366 @example
3367 @{
3368     ... 
3369     idx i(symbol("i"), 4);
3370     realsymbol s("s");
3371     ex M = diag_matrix(lst@{1, -1, 0, s@});
3372     ex e = clifford_unit(i, M);
3373     ex e0 = e.subs(i == 0);
3374     ex e1 = e.subs(i == 1);
3375     ex e2 = e.subs(i == 2);
3376     ex e3 = e.subs(i == 3);
3377     ...
3378 @}
3379 @end example
3380
3381 will produce four anti-commuting generators of a Clifford algebra with properties
3382 @tex
3383 $e_0^2=1 $, $e_1^2=-1$,  $e_2^2=0$ and $e_3^2=s$.
3384 @end tex
3385 @ifnottex
3386 @code{pow(e0, 2) = 1}, @code{pow(e1, 2) = -1}, @code{pow(e2, 2) = 0} and
3387 @code{pow(e3, 2) = s}.
3388 @end ifnottex
3389
3390 @cindex @code{lst_to_clifford()}
3391 A similar effect can be achieved from the function
3392
3393 @example
3394     ex lst_to_clifford(const ex & v, const ex & mu,  const ex & metr,
3395                        unsigned char rl = 0);
3396     ex lst_to_clifford(const ex & v, const ex & e);
3397 @end example
3398
3399 which converts a list or vector 
3400 @tex
3401 $v = (v^0, v^1, ..., v^n)$
3402 @end tex
3403 @ifnottex
3404 @samp{v = (v~0, v~1, ..., v~n)} 
3405 @end ifnottex
3406 into the
3407 Clifford number 
3408 @tex
3409 $v^0 e_0 + v^1 e_1 + ... + v^n e_n$
3410 @end tex
3411 @ifnottex
3412 @samp{v~0 e.0 + v~1 e.1 + ... + v~n e.n}
3413 @end ifnottex
3414 with @samp{e.k}
3415 directly supplied in the second form of the procedure. In the first form
3416 the Clifford unit @samp{e.k} is generated by the call of
3417 @code{clifford_unit(mu, metr, rl)}. 
3418 @cindex pseudo-vector
3419 If the number of components supplied
3420 by @code{v} exceeds the dimensionality of the Clifford unit @code{e} by
3421 1 then function @code{lst_to_clifford()} uses the following
3422 pseudo-vector representation: 
3423 @tex
3424 $v^0 {\bf 1} + v^1 e_0 + v^2 e_1 + ... + v^{n+1} e_n$
3425 @end tex
3426 @ifnottex
3427 @samp{v~0 ONE + v~1 e.0 + v~2 e.1 + ... + v~[n+1] e.n}
3428 @end ifnottex
3429
3430 The previous code may be rewritten with the help of @code{lst_to_clifford()} as follows
3431
3432 @example
3433 @{
3434     ...
3435     idx i(symbol("i"), 4);
3436     realsymbol s("s");
3437     ex M = diag_matrix(@{1, -1, 0, s@});
3438     ex e0 = lst_to_clifford(lst@{1, 0, 0, 0@}, i, M);
3439     ex e1 = lst_to_clifford(lst@{0, 1, 0, 0@}, i, M);
3440     ex e2 = lst_to_clifford(lst@{0, 0, 1, 0@}, i, M);
3441     ex e3 = lst_to_clifford(lst@{0, 0, 0, 1@}, i, M);
3442   ...
3443 @}
3444 @end example
3445
3446 @cindex @code{clifford_to_lst()}
3447 There is the inverse function 
3448
3449 @example
3450     lst clifford_to_lst(const ex & e, const ex & c, bool algebraic = true);
3451 @end example
3452
3453 which takes an expression @code{e} and tries to find a list
3454 @tex
3455 $v = (v^0, v^1, ..., v^n)$
3456 @end tex
3457 @ifnottex
3458 @samp{v = (v~0, v~1, ..., v~n)} 
3459 @end ifnottex
3460 such that the expression is either vector 
3461 @tex
3462 $e = v^0 c_0 + v^1 c_1 + ... + v^n c_n$
3463 @end tex
3464 @ifnottex
3465 @samp{e = v~0 c.0 + v~1 c.1 + ... + v~n c.n}
3466 @end ifnottex
3467 or pseudo-vector 
3468 @tex
3469 $v^0 {\bf 1} + v^1 e_0 + v^2 e_1 + ... + v^{n+1} e_n$
3470 @end tex
3471 @ifnottex
3472 @samp{v~0 ONE + v~1 e.0 + v~2 e.1 + ... + v~[n+1] e.n}
3473 @end ifnottex
3474 with respect to the given Clifford units @code{c}. Here none of the
3475 @samp{v~k} should contain Clifford units @code{c} (of course, this
3476 may be impossible). This function can use an @code{algebraic} method
3477 (default) or a symbolic one. With the @code{algebraic} method the
3478 @samp{v~k} are calculated as 
3479 @tex
3480 $(e c_k + c_k e)/c_k^2$. If $c_k^2$
3481 @end tex
3482 @ifnottex
3483 @samp{(e c.k + c.k e)/pow(c.k, 2)}.   If @samp{pow(c.k, 2)} 
3484 @end ifnottex
3485 is zero or is not @code{numeric} for some @samp{k}
3486 then the method will be automatically changed to symbolic. The same effect
3487 is obtained by the assignment (@code{algebraic = false}) in the procedure call.
3488
3489 @cindex @code{clifford_prime()}
3490 @cindex @code{clifford_star()}
3491 @cindex @code{clifford_bar()}
3492 There are several functions for (anti-)automorphisms of Clifford algebras:
3493
3494 @example
3495     ex clifford_prime(const ex & e)
3496     inline ex clifford_star(const ex & e)
3497     inline ex clifford_bar(const ex & e)
3498 @end example
3499
3500 The automorphism of a Clifford algebra @code{clifford_prime()} simply
3501 changes signs of all Clifford units in the expression. The reversion
3502 of a Clifford algebra @code{clifford_star()} reverses the order of Clifford
3503 units in any product. Finally the main anti-automorphism
3504 of a Clifford algebra @code{clifford_bar()} is the composition of the
3505 previous two, i.e. it makes the reversion and changes signs of all Clifford units
3506 in a product. These functions correspond to the notations
3507 @math{e'},
3508 @tex
3509 $e^*$
3510 @end tex
3511 @ifnottex
3512 e*
3513 @end ifnottex
3514 and
3515 @tex
3516 $\overline{e}$
3517 @end tex
3518 @ifnottex
3519 @code{\bar@{e@}}
3520 @end ifnottex
3521 used in Clifford algebra textbooks.
3522
3523 @cindex @code{clifford_norm()}
3524 The function
3525
3526 @example
3527     ex clifford_norm(const ex & e);
3528 @end example
3529
3530 @cindex @code{clifford_inverse()}
3531 calculates the norm of a Clifford number from the expression
3532 @tex
3533 $||e||^2 = e\overline{e}$.
3534 @end tex
3535 @ifnottex
3536 @code{||e||^2 = e \bar@{e@}}
3537 @end ifnottex
3538  The inverse of a Clifford expression is returned by the function
3539
3540 @example
3541     ex clifford_inverse(const ex & e);
3542 @end example
3543
3544 which calculates it as 
3545 @tex
3546 $e^{-1} = \overline{e}/||e||^2$.
3547 @end tex
3548 @ifnottex
3549 @math{e^@{-1@} = \bar@{e@}/||e||^2}
3550 @end ifnottex
3551  If
3552 @tex
3553 $||e|| = 0$
3554 @end tex
3555 @ifnottex
3556 @math{||e||=0}
3557 @end ifnottex
3558 then an exception is raised.
3559
3560 @cindex @code{remove_dirac_ONE()}
3561 If a Clifford number happens to be a factor of
3562 @code{dirac_ONE()} then we can convert it to a ``real'' (non-Clifford)
3563 expression by the function
3564
3565 @example
3566     ex remove_dirac_ONE(const ex & e);
3567 @end example
3568
3569 @cindex @code{canonicalize_clifford()}
3570 The function @code{canonicalize_clifford()} works for a
3571 generic Clifford algebra in a similar way as for Dirac gammas.
3572
3573 The next provided function is
3574
3575 @cindex @code{clifford_moebius_map()}
3576 @example
3577     ex clifford_moebius_map(const ex & a, const ex & b, const ex & c,
3578                             const ex & d, const ex & v, const ex & G,
3579                             unsigned char rl = 0);
3580     ex clifford_moebius_map(const ex & M, const ex & v, const ex & G,
3581                             unsigned char rl = 0);
3582 @end example 
3583
3584 It takes a list or vector @code{v} and makes the Moebius (conformal or
3585 linear-fractional) transformation @samp{v -> (av+b)/(cv+d)} defined by
3586 the matrix @samp{M = [[a, b], [c, d]]}. The parameter @code{G} defines
3587 the metric of the surrounding (pseudo-)Euclidean space. This can be an
3588 indexed object, tensormetric, matrix or a Clifford unit, in the later
3589 case the optional parameter @code{rl} is ignored even if supplied.
3590 Depending from the type of @code{v} the returned value of this function
3591 is either a vector or a list holding vector's components.
3592
3593 @cindex @code{clifford_max_label()}
3594 Finally the function
3595
3596 @example
3597 char clifford_max_label(const ex & e, bool ignore_ONE = false);
3598 @end example
3599
3600 can detect a presence of Clifford objects in the expression @code{e}: if
3601 such objects are found it returns the maximal
3602 @code{representation_label} of them, otherwise @code{-1}. The optional
3603 parameter @code{ignore_ONE} indicates if @code{dirac_ONE} objects should
3604 be ignored during the search.
3605  
3606 LaTeX output for Clifford units looks like
3607 @code{\clifford[1]@{e@}^@{@{\nu@}@}}, where @code{1} is the
3608 @code{representation_label} and @code{\nu} is the index of the
3609 corresponding unit. This provides a flexible typesetting with a suitable
3610 definition of the @code{\clifford} command. For example, the definition
3611 @example
3612     \newcommand@{\clifford@}[1][]@{@}
3613 @end example
3614 typesets all Clifford units identically, while the alternative definition
3615 @example
3616     \newcommand@{\clifford@}[2][]@{\ifcase #1 #2\or \tilde@{#2@} \or \breve@{#2@} \fi@}
3617 @end example
3618 prints units with @code{representation_label=0} as 
3619 @tex
3620 $e$,
3621 @end tex
3622 @ifnottex
3623 @code{e},
3624 @end ifnottex
3625 with @code{representation_label=1} as 
3626 @tex
3627 $\tilde{e}$
3628 @end tex
3629 @ifnottex
3630 @code{\tilde@{e@}}
3631 @end ifnottex
3632  and with @code{representation_label=2} as 
3633 @tex
3634 $\breve{e}$.
3635 @end tex
3636 @ifnottex
3637 @code{\breve@{e@}}.
3638 @end ifnottex
3639
3640 @cindex @code{color} (class)
3641 @subsection Color algebra
3642
3643 @cindex @code{color_T()}
3644 For computations in quantum chromodynamics, GiNaC implements the base elements
3645 and structure constants of the su(3) Lie algebra (color algebra). The base
3646 elements @math{T_a} are constructed by the function
3647
3648 @example
3649 ex color_T(const ex & a, unsigned char rl = 0);
3650 @end example
3651
3652 which takes two arguments: the index and a @dfn{representation label} in the
3653 range 0 to 255 which is used to distinguish elements of different color
3654 algebras. Objects with different labels commutate with each other. The
3655 dimension of the index must be exactly 8 and it should be of class @code{idx},
3656 not @code{varidx}.
3657
3658 @cindex @code{color_ONE()}
3659 The unity element of a color algebra is constructed by
3660
3661 @example
3662 ex color_ONE(unsigned char rl = 0);
3663 @end example
3664
3665 @strong{Please notice:} You must always use @code{color_ONE()} when referring to
3666 multiples of the unity element, even though it's customary to omit it.
3667 E.g. instead of @code{color_T(a)*(color_T(b)*indexed(X,b)+1)} you have to
3668 write @code{color_T(a)*(color_T(b)*indexed(X,b)+color_ONE())}. Otherwise,
3669 GiNaC may produce incorrect results.
3670
3671 @cindex @code{color_d()}
3672 @cindex @code{color_f()}
3673 The functions
3674
3675 @example
3676 ex color_d(const ex & a, const ex & b, const ex & c);
3677 ex color_f(const ex & a, const ex & b, const ex & c);
3678 @end example
3679
3680 create the symmetric and antisymmetric structure constants @math{d_abc} and
3681 @math{f_abc} which satisfy @math{@{T_a, T_b@} = 1/3 delta_ab + d_abc T_c}
3682 and @math{[T_a, T_b] = i f_abc T_c}.
3683
3684 These functions evaluate to their numerical values,
3685 if you supply numeric indices to them. The index values should be in
3686 the range from 1 to 8, not from 0 to 7. This departure from usual conventions
3687 goes along better with the notations used in physical literature.
3688
3689 @cindex @code{color_h()}
3690 There's an additional function
3691
3692 @example
3693 ex color_h(const ex & a, const ex & b, const ex & c);
3694 @end example
3695
3696 which returns the linear combination @samp{color_d(a, b, c)+I*color_f(a, b, c)}.
3697
3698 The function @code{simplify_indexed()} performs some simplifications on
3699 expressions containing color objects:
3700
3701 @example
3702 @{
3703     ...
3704     idx a(symbol("a"), 8), b(symbol("b"), 8), c(symbol("c"), 8),
3705         k(symbol("k"), 8), l(symbol("l"), 8);
3706
3707     e = color_d(a, b, l) * color_f(a, b, k);
3708     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
3709      // -> 0
3710
3711     e = color_d(a, b, l) * color_d(a, b, k);
3712     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
3713      // -> 5/3*delta.k.l
3714
3715     e = color_f(l, a, b) * color_f(a, b, k);
3716     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
3717      // -> 3*delta.k.l
3718
3719     e = color_h(a, b, c) * color_h(a, b, c);
3720     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
3721      // -> -32/3
3722
3723     e = color_h(a, b, c) * color_T(b) * color_T(c);
3724     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
3725      // -> -2/3*T.a
3726
3727     e = color_h(a, b, c) * color_T(a) * color_T(b) * color_T(c);
3728     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
3729      // -> -8/9*ONE
3730
3731     e = color_T(k) * color_T(a) * color_T(b) * color_T(k);
3732     cout << e.simplify_indexed() << endl;
3733      // -> 1/4*delta.b.a*ONE-1/6*T.a*T.b
3734     ...
3735 @end example
3736
3737 @cindex @code{color_trace()}
3738 To calculate the trace of an expression containing color objects you use one
3739 of the functions
3740
3741 @example
3742 ex color_trace(const ex & e, const std::set<unsigned char> & rls);
3743 ex color_trace(const ex & e, const lst & rll);
3744 ex color_trace(const ex & e, unsigned char rl = 0);
3745 @end example
3746
3747 These functions take the trace over all color @samp{T} objects in the
3748 specified set @code{rls} or list @code{rll} of representation labels, or the
3749 single label @code{rl}; @samp{T}s with other labels are left standing. For
3750 example:
3751